Athletic Training

Follow your passion for athletics and exercise

Athletic training is an allied healthcare profession that works with athletes and active individuals to aid in preventing, diagnosing, treating and rehabilitating injuries. The Loras College Athletic Training major prepares students to follow their passion for athletics and exercise while working with a diverse group of people in the field or clinic.

We have established partnerships throughout the tri-state community with a variety of healthcare providers, high schools and local businesses. The Loras College Athletic Training program is at the forefront of changing professional requirements, by initiating a 3+2 dual degree option, offering both a Bachelors of Arts degree in Kinesiology (B.A.) + a Masters degree in Athletic Training (M.A.T.)

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Clinical experience

The clinical experience is vital to the success of the Athletic Training student at Loras College. Students will be assigned to work in a variety of health care settings and encounter a variety of athletes and patients. These rotations begin during the fall of the student’s sophomore year and continue through graduation.

These settings allow the students to directly put into practice the skills and knowledge they learn in the classroom. During these rotations the students work with a dedicated clinical staff.

Our clinical sites have included:

  • Loras College
  • Western Dubuque High School
  • Dyersville Beckman High School
  • Galena (Illinois) High School
  • Dubuque Physical Therapy
  • Spine and Sport Chiropractic
  • Finley Hospital
  • Dubuque Fighting Saints Hockey
  • Westside Orthopedic Clinic
  • Medical Associates Clinic

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How will the Athletic Training program prepare you for your internship?

The Loras College Athletic Training Education Program is committed to providing our students with a quality education. Students are exposed to a variety of athletic training settings during their time at Loras College. As part of their education, we encourage students to broaden their resumes and grow with a variety of experiences and internships.

We have had students experience outstanding internships with several organizations, including the St. Louis Rams, Chicago Fire, Athletico (sports medicine clinic in Chicago), Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN), Loras College All-Sports Camps and Athletes in Action summer camps. Each internship was, in part, set up by networking with past and current Loras College athletic training staff members.

Read about more experiences of Loras College athletic training graduates by visiting our Internships page.

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Athletic Training internship experiences

One of the most beneficial opportunities Loras College has to offer is providing students with experience to build their resume and prepare them for the work force. Click “Read More” below for details on internships that have assisted former students in getting the job they’ve worked for.

Anne Grabowski (’10) and Adam Burke (’09) both experienced outstanding internships with professional athletic teams due to networking with Loras athletic training staff members of the past and present.

Anne Grabowski (’10)

Hometown: Crestwood, IL
Degree: BA degree in Athletic Training

Talk about your experience with the Major League Soccer team, Chicago Fire:

I had a summer internship (2009) with the Chicago Fire MLS Team. I was the only athletic training intern for the summer, and it was provided through AthletiCo (a Chicagoland rehabilitation, fitness and performance clinic).

I was there for practices and home games. Home games were the best part of the experience because I got to be on the field with the players for warm-ups and the game, and all the fans saw me on the field. Not to mention, I was on TV a few times. Another great aspect was getting to know the players. Aside from their fame, they really are regular people. I formed great friendships not only with the team but also with the coaches and athletic training staff.

How did the athletic training program prepare you for your internship?

The clinical experience we get through the AT program gives us a chance to experience many types of injuries and the evaluations that coincide with them. This experience gives us the confidence to go out into the real world and be comfortable with our skills.

What would you say to a student interested in majoring in Athletic Training at Loras College?

The AT major is the only major where you practice what you learn every day. You get hands-on experience every day, and all that hard work really does pay off.

How did Loras prepare you for your future?

They provided me the education, clinical experience and confidence for the real world.

Years from now, what will you tell your children about your college experience?

College was a lot of hard work, but the experiences I had were unforgettable.

Adam Burke (’09)

Hometown: Charlotte, IA
Degree: BA in Athletic Training

What are you doing now?

I am working on earning my master’s degree in Athletic Training at the University of Northern Iowa. I work as a Graduate Assistant for the Cedar Valley Youth Soccer Association and as a physician’s extender in an orthopedic clinic on the UNI campus.

Talk about your experience with the NFL team St. Louis Rams:

I worked as an intern athletic trainer for the St. Louis Rams. I worked closely with the Rams’ medical staff and players, providing treatment, taping and first aid during training-camp practices. I also got the chance to be on the sidelines for a preseason game at the Edward-Jones Dome (Rams’ stadium).

I learned what it takes to be an athletic trainer in a professional sports setting and how much of a business professional sport teams are. This was a great time for me to gain experience in such a prestigious athletic setting, something not everyone has the opportunity to do.

How did the Athletic Training program prepare you for your internship?

The Loras Athletic Training program prepared me by providing the skills I needed to fulfill my job with the Rams. The skills I learned gave me the confidence to perform my duties in an athletic training setting I had never experienced.

What would you say to a student interested in majoring in athletic training at Loras College?

I would tell them that this is a good program that will prepare you for a career in multiple health careers after college. The staff is very good to work with and will push you to reach your potential. I loved my time in the program and would want someone else to get the same great experience.

How did Loras prepare you for your future?

Loras College prepared me for my future by teaching me important life skills both outside and inside my career of choice. Loras provided me with many opportunities that taught me how to effectively communicate, ethically express myself, and develop as an individual. Loras also taught me the skills and tools I need to have a successful career in athletic training.

Years from now, what will you tell your children about your college experience?
I will share with my children how much I enjoyed my college experience and how the relationships I developed with classmates, friends and staff members created an unforgettable experience. I will also tell them how important it will be for them to enjoy their short time in college because these were some of the best years of my life, and they will most likely only experience the college life once.

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Athletic Training program highlights

The Athletic Training program helps prepare students for the Board of Certification exam. This exam ensures that students gain the necessary skills for entry-level positions in athletic training. Additionally, students can be nominated for the Doc Kammer Scholarship award. Doc Kammer was a long-time athletic trainer for Loras College from 1929–1971 and has been generous in continuing to offer this scholarship annually.

Board of Certification (BOC) Exam Preparation

Upon graduation, students are eligible to take the Board of Certification (BOC) exam to ensure that they have learned and can apply the skills an entry-level athletic trainer needs. Our students are well-prepared for this exam during their education. Students take comprehensive exams at the end of each semester to track learning and assessment of program classes. Every test in each athletic training course has a similar format so students are familiar and comfortable when they sit for the exam. Students are given an individual plan of study for the exam during their senior year so they can best prepare for the exam. Students are also provided with a staff mentor who will help them study and prepare for the exam during their senior year.

Doc Kammer Scholarship

Each fall, athletic training students are nominated by the Division of Sport Studies faculty and fellow students for the Doc Kammer Scholarship award. This scholarship was generously set up by the family of Doc Kammer, who served as an athletic trainer for Loras College from 1929-1971. Nominated students compete and are selected for the award based on their involvement in extracurricular activities, profession of training and future career goals.

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Athletic Training program admission requirements

Loras College’s Athletic Training major is a competitive program designed for top talent. Click the link below to find specific information relating to the application and admission process as well as the requirements necessary for completion of this program.

Athletic Training program Admission Requirements

Major Requirements

Division of Molecular, Health & Life Sciences
Sara Glover, Ph.D., Chair

Requirements for the major in Athletic Training (B.A.):

The CAATE Accredited Athletic Training Education Program is designed to provide quality classroom and clinical athletic training experiences that will prepare students to be caring professionals, active learners and responsible contributors in healthcare careers. The main focus of the major is on classroom learning applied during clinical rotations (ATR 280, 281, 380, 381, 482 and 483). Clinical rotation sites include: college athletics, high school athletics, USHL hockey and a variety of hospital and clinic settings. Information on specific clinical rotation policies can be found on the program’s webpage.

Students must apply to the Athletic Training major. Selections for admission into the Athletic Training Program (ATP) are made during each spring semester for traditional students. Transfer and non-traditional students should contact the program director for further information on applying to the major. The selection process is competitive. The ideal candidate will demonstrate strong academic ability, motivation for the program, a plan to use the major in their future career and the ability to integrate and work well within the major and clinical assignments.

The application process will start during the fall semester and include observation hours, a written essay and an interview. Students must achieve 70% of possible points on the evaluations during the interview process. Additionally, a minimum gpa of 2.25 during the first year and a B– or higher in ATR 130 is required.

Upon acceptance into the program, students must maintain a minimum gpa of 2.6 each semester in major courses and earn a C– or better in all major courses. Failure to meet the minimum gpa requirement will place the student on probation. A student will have one semester to achieve a minimum gpa. Failure to do this will result in the student being dismissed from the program.

Req Course Credits
1 L.ATR-130: Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries 3
2 L.ATR-140: Emergency Care of Athletic Injuries/First Aid 3
3 L.ATR-150: Medical Terminology & Pharmacology 3
4 L.ATR-280: Athletic Training Clinical I 1
5 L.ATR-280: Athletic Training Clinical II 1
6 L.ATR-290: Evaluation of Athletic Injuries I 3
7 L.ATR-290: Evaluation of Athletic Injuries II 3
8 L.ATR-380: Athletic Training Clinical III 1
9 L.ATR-380: Athletic Training Clinical IV 1
10 L.ATR-382: Therapeutic Modalities 3
11 L.ATR-383: Therapeutic Exercise 3
12 L.ATR-455: Advanced Care and Prevention 3
13 L.ATR-480: Organization and Administration in Athletic Training 3
14 L.ATR-482: Athletic Training Clinical V 1
15 L.ATR-483: Athletic Training Clinical VI–Portfolio 1
16 L.BIO-115: Principles of Biology 4
17 L.BIO-260: Human Anatomy and Physiology-AH 4
18 L.BIO-365: Human Cadaver Anatomy 4
19 L.CHE-111: General Chemistry I 4
20 L.KIN-145: Nutrition 3
21 L.KIN-230: Musculoskeletal Anatomy 4
22 L.KIN-322: Physiology of Exercise 3
23 L.KIN-344: Theory of Strength Training & Conditioning 3
24 L.KIN-370: Fitness Prescription and Exercise 3
Select two from Req. 25
25 L.PSY-101: Intro to Psychology 3
25 L.PSY-121: Developmental Psychology 3
25 L.PSY-221: Abnormal Psychology 3
Course Descriptions

L.ATR-130: Care & Prevention of Athletic Injuries

In this course, students are introduced to the role of the athletic trainer and the prevention of athletic injuries. Administrative and practical methods to prevent injuries common in the allied healthcare fields will be discussed. Additionally, the use of Evidence–Based Medicine will be introduced to help students understand which techniques will best prevent injuries. 3 credits.

L.ATR-140: Emergency Care of Athletic Injuries/First Aid

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to injury prevention and first aid. This course provides the potential coach, educator or human movement practitioner with essential knowledge related to basic first aid skills, prevention, recognition and management of common sport injuries, and the role of various practitioners in the injury/rehabilitation process. 3 credits.

L.ATR-150: Medical Terminology & Pharmacology

This course offers an introduction to learning both medical and technical vocabulary by focusing on the Latin and Greek elements in English words. One of the primary purposes of this course is to teach the student how to determine the meaning of a scientific word by breaking down its structure in terms of prefix, stem or stems and suffix. As an added benefit, students will acquire a lasting fascination with words and their origins. This course also focuses on providing a foundation into the legal concerns, pharmacokinetics and terminology of common medications in the allied healthcare fields. 3 credits.

L.ATR-280: Athletic Training Clinical I

Clinical education practical hours in the athletic training room for the sophomore-level student. Clinical experiences are provided in a variety of athletic training settings utilizing Loras College Approved Clinical Instructors. Student is responsible for transportation and fees involved if placed at an off-campus site. Prerequisite: admission to athletic training major. 1 credit.

L.ATR-281: Athletic Training Clinical II

Clinical education practical hours in the athletic training room for the sophomore-level student. Clinical experiences are provided in a variety of athletic training settings utilizing Loras College Approved Clinical Instructors. Student is responsible for transportation and fees involved if placed at an off-campus site. Prerequisite: L.ATR-280. 1 credit.

L.ATR-290: Evaluation of Athletic Injuries I

Introduction to athletic injury evaluation and assessment of conditions affecting the lower extremity. Provides special instruction in medical terminology. Prerequisites: L.ATR-130 and admission to the athletic training major. 3 credits.

L.ATR-291: Evaluation of Athletic Injuries II

Introduction to athletic injury evaluation and assessment of conditions affecting the upper extremity. Prerequisite: L.ATR-290. 3 credits.

L.ATR-350: Psychology of Athletic Injuries–AI

Participation in sports comes with the risk of injury. The questions that occur after the injury include: Could have it been prevented? What treatment should be done? What is the future for that patient in regards to activity? The ‘correct’ answer to those questions will vary greatly in different groups of our society. Those variations have always been debated, but that debate seems to have garnered more attention as of late. This course will examine not only the physical effect of an injury, but the psychological and sociological factors that play a role in how an injury is viewed, treated and responded to. In particular, focus will be on how the athlete, the team, the healthcare system, family members and society in general respond to and act towards injuries. Additionally includes an examination of how these responses have changed over time and what changes need to be made in the future. A portion of this class will focus on community- based learning. Students in the course will present and collaborate with local high school students on a research study. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110 and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135 or L.LIB-220. 3 credits. January term.

L.ATR-380: Athletic Training Clinical III

Clinical education practical hours in the athletic training room for the junior-level student. Clinical experiences are provided in a variety of athletic training settings utilizing Loras College Approved Clinical Instructors. Student is responsible for transportation and fees involved if placed at an off-campus site. Prerequisite: L.ATR-281. 1 credit.

L.ATR-381: Athletic Training Clinical IV

Clinical education practical hours in the athletic training room for the junior-level student. Clinical experiences are provided in a variety of athletic training settings utilizing Loras College Approved Clinical Instructors. Student is responsible for transportation and fees involved if placed at an off-campus site. Prerequisite: L.ATR-380. 1 credit.

L.ATR-382: Therapeutic Modalities

Methods and techniques in the application of selected therapeutic modalities and athletic injury treatment relative to modality usage. Laboratory component. Prerequisite: L.ATR-130 or L.ATR-140. 3 credits.

L.ATR-383: Therapeutic Exercise

Methods and techniques in the selection and application of rehabilitation techniques in sports medicine. Laboratory component. Prerequisite: L.ATR-130 or L.ATR-140. 3 credits.

L.ATR-455: Advanced Care & Prevention

This course emphasizes general medical conditions of athletes, including; dermatology nutrition, injuries and illnesses, cardiology, pharmacology and the female triad. Prerequisites: L.ATR-291. Athletic Training majors only. 3 credits.

L.ATR-480: Organization & Administration in Athletic Training

This course provides experience in athletic training administration, including the opportunity to plan, coordinate and supervise all administrative components of an athletic training program for the high school, college or professional athletic organization. Prerequisites: L.ATR-130. Athletic training majors only. 3 credits.

L.ATR-482: Athletic Training Clinical V

Clinical education practical hours in the athletic training room for the senior-level student. Clinical experiences are provided in a variety of athletic training settings utilizing Loras College Approved Clinical Instructors. Student is responsible for transportation and fees involved, if placed at an off-campus site. Prerequisite: L.ATR-381. 1 credit.

L.ATR-483: Athletic Training Clinical VI–Portfolio

This course will allow athletic training students the opportunity to reflect on their liberal arts education both within the athletic training education program as well as their general education opportunities at Loras College. The course will give the students several prompts from which they will relate their educational growth and experiences within the College mission statement. Additionally students will produce an electronic portfolio which will include a résumé appropriate for a postgraduate position that demonstrates their capabilities in the competencies and proficiencies written by the Executive Education Committee of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association. Prerequisite: L.ATR-482. 1 credit.

RELATED COURSES: Kinesiology/Sport Science, Sport Management

Program Objectives & CAATE Accreditation

Loras College Athletic Training Program

Loras College Athletic Training

The Loras College Athletic Training program is fully accredited through the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) through the 2018-2019 academic year. See accreditation details below.

1. Recruit students who are motivated to be a part of this major and will integrate well into the program by performing at a high level in both the educational and clinical components of the major.
2. Develop students who act as ethical and responsible professionals.
3. Prepare students to pass the BOC exam. Our goal is to have at least an 80% first-time pass rate.
4. Develop students so they can critically think and problem-solve in professional settings.
5. Provide students with diverse clinical opportunities that allow them to be active learners.
6. Expose students to a wide variety of guest speakers from the medical community, either in the classroom or by
attending state and national conferences.
7. Provide students with the opportunity to conduct and present research at the local, state and national levels.

Outcome Measurements of the Athletic Training Program Board of Certification Results

3-Year Aggregate Information (2012–2015):

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 3-Year Aggregate
Number of students graduating from the program 11 12 6 29
Number of students graduating from the program who took the BOC exam 9 9 4 22
Number/percentage of students who passed the BOC exam on the first attempt 6/67% 5/56% 3/75% 14/64%
Overall number/percentage of students passing the BOC exam despite the number of attempts 7/78% 7/78% 4/100% 18/82%

Retention Rate of Students

2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 3-Year Aggregate
Overall Number of Students admitted into the Program 12 13 11 36
Number of Students who graduated from program 11 13 8 32
Overall Retention Rate 92% 100% 73% 89%

Employment of Students

2012-2013 Cohort 2013-2014 2014-2015 3-Year Aggregate 3-year aggreate %
Employed as an Athletic Trainer 3 2 2 7 22%
Employed other than an athletic trainer 3 5 2 10 31%
Employed as an Athletic Trainer and enrolled in a degree program 3 4 1 8 25%
Not Employed due to military service 0 0 0 0 0%
Not Employed due to enrollment in another degree program 2 2 2 6 19%
Not Employed 0 0 0 0 0%
Do not know 0 0 1 1 3%

Graduation Rate

2012-2013 Cohort 2013-2014 2014-2015 3-Year Aggregate
Overall Number of Students Completing Program 11 13 8 32
Overall Number Students Graduating from Program in 6 years or less 11 13 8 32
Percent of Students Graduating from program in 6 years or less 100% 100% 100% 100%

Placement Rates

3-Year Aggregate Information (2013–15)
Total number of students graduating: 29
Percentage of students placed in either a job or graduate program within 1 year of graduation: 84.3% Percentage of students placed in graduate school within 1 year of graduation: 44.8%
Percentage of students place in a job within 1 year of graduation: 41.4%

The Loras College Athletic Training Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). The program has been placed on Probation as of February 19, 2016 by the CAATE, 6850 Austin Center Blvd., Suite 100, Austin, TX 78731-3101.

Career Opportunities

After receiving your degree from Loras, your career could take off into one of these fields or venues:

  • Athletic Trainer
  • Athletic Clinical Staff
  • Sports Medicine
  • Clinics/Hospitals
  • High Schools
  • Colleges and Universities
  • Business and Industry
  • Performing Arts
  • Military

In addition to a career in athletic training, students use their major in athletic training and continue on to further gain further education and employment as:

  • Physical Therapist
  • Physician Assistant
  • Chiropractor
  • Other allied health care providers
Loras College Department Staff

Sara Glover, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Kinesiology
563-588-7006 | Sara.Glover@loras.edu

Dr. Sara Glover is an Associate Professor of Kinesiology and serves as Kinesiology Program Coordinator. She has been with Loras since the fall of 2006. Dr. Glover teaches courses in exercise physiology, research methods and exercise psychology. Her research interests are in the areas of motor-skill learning and re-learning and, more recently, strategies for enhancing student engagement and learning in the Kinesiology classroom.

Originally from California, Dr. Glover earned her master’s in Kinesiology with an emphasis in sport performance from California State University, Sacramento. She earned her doctorate from the University of Virginia, where she focused her studies in the areas of motor learning and sport and exercise psychology.

Thomas Kult, M.A., C.S.C.S.
Instructor of Kinesiology
563-588-4964 | Thomas.Kult@loras.edu

Tom Kult teaches courses in Nutrition, Fitness Assessment & Exercise Prescription, Strength Training & Conditioning and Methods of Group Exercise. He has been teaching at Loras College since 2000. His research interests include the use of heart-rate monitors during exercise and sport, Nordic walking sticks and implementation fitness classes in middle school and high school students.

Elaina Mertens, Ph.D., C.S.C.S., H.F.S.
Assistant Professor of Sport Science Assistant Professor of Biology
563-588-2297 | Elaina.Mertens@loras.edu

Elaina Mertens holds a doctorate degree and master’s degree in Exercise Physiology from Spring eld College. Dr. Mertens completed her Bachelor’s Degree at Coe College with a major in Fitness Development, specializing in Strength & Conditioning and Health & Wellness. She is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist through the NSCA and a certified Health and Fitness Specialist through ACSM. She has experience as a personal trainer, track and cross-country coach at the high school and college levels and also as an educator. She has taught coursework including Exercise Physiology, Sports Nutrition, Principles of Personal Training, Human Anatomy and Physiology and Kinesiology. She currently teaches Musculoskeletal Anatomy and Personal and Community Health at Loras.

Dr. Mertens’ research interests include physiological performance factors for athletes, specifically distance runners and triathletes, including metabolic factors and performance enhancement through sports nutrition. Her research interests developed not only through the study of exercise physiology but also through her experience as a practitioner. She is an experienced triathlete and distance runner, completing the Boston Marathon several times and competing on Team USA in Long Course Triathlon. Dr. Mertens hopes her research exploring performance issues specific to endurance sports will inspire and engage her students to begin to investigate areas of their own interest within the field of Exercise Science.

Nathan Newman, MS, ATC
Assistant Professor of Athletic Training / Kinesiology
563-588-7211 | Nathan.Newman@loras.edu
Curriculum Vitae

Professor Nathan Newman was appointed to the position of Athletic Training Program Director and Associate Professor in 2011. Previously he had worked as an Assistant Athletic Trainer for ve years. Since becoming the Program Director, he has overseen a dramatic growth in the number of students in the Athletic Training major, going from 21 students in 2011 to 35 students in 2013. The program has also seen changes in clinical education opportunities and students’ performance in the classroom. Professor Newman’s education includes degrees from the University of Iowa and Western Illinois University. He is currently completing his doctoral degree at the University of Iowa and resides in Dubuque with his wife, Diana, and son, Bennett.