English-Creative Writing

Follow your passion for writing

The Creative Writing major at Loras College offers extraordinary depth and range, together with the kind of close, sustained faculty mentoring which is only possible at a small college. Students choose from introductory and advanced courses in Fiction, Poetry, and Creative Nonfiction, along with specialized courses in Screenwriting; Nature Writing; Fantastic Fiction; Writing for New Media; Writing as Social Action; Rhetoric & Political Engagement, Grant & Proposal Writing; and Revision, Editing & Publishing. All Creative Writing courses have no more than 15 students, and are taught by experienced and well-published full-time faculty.

Our Creative Writing majors are introduced to rigorous critical reading  in Literary Studies, sharpen their analytical skills in Literary Criticism, and choose several courses from the whole history of English and American literature, in all genres, and from selected courses in Irish, Canadian, Russian, and World literatures. Many also choose a second major in English Literature to deepen their literary knowledge. (The Bauerly-Roseliep Scholarship is awarded each year to the graduating senior who most excels in both majors.) Students with an interest in writing for purposes of social and political engagement can also minor in Rhetoric & Public Writing.

In their final year, all Creative Writing majors write a creative thesis in a genre of their choice in the Senior Thesis Seminar. In addition, each student works closely over two semesters with a full-time Creative Writing faculty member to write and revise this extended writing project: a novel or novella, a group of short stories or essays, a collection of poems, a screenplay, or a play.

Creative Writing majors are actively engaged on campus and beyond. A student editorial staff edits and publishes Catfish Creek: A National Undergraduate Literary Journal. Our students present their scholarly and creative writing on campus at the college’s annual Legacy Symposium, and, along with students from other colleges, at the annual Streamlines Undergraduate Language & Literature Conference. Many of our students also publish their writing in The Limestone Review, the college’s annual journal of scholarship and creative writing.

The best writing in each of four genres published in The Limestone Review each year is awarded the $100 Alpha Award, and entered in the Delta Epsilon Sigma national undergraduate writing competition. In 2015, our students won first place in this contest in three of the four genres: Poetry, Nonfiction Essay, and Scholarly Essay. In fact, at least one Loras student has won at least Honorable Mention in this national contest each year for the last twenty-four years.

Many of our students also land internships at local newspapers and publishing houses, including McGraw-Hill and Kendall Hunt. Many study abroad in Ireland for a semester in connection with the Irish Studies program, or write for and edit The Lorian (the Loras College newspaper). And many participate in the Loras Players theater troupe, including their annual performance of student-written one-act plays.

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ALUMNI CAREERS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

English is a valuable and marketable major. Students learn to write and speak well, to think critically, to collaborate with others and to understand diversity. These skills are important in any career, and Loras English graduates work in a wide range of fields.

Career preparation flexibility is also enhanced by the ability to combine English with other majors and minors in a four-year program. Loras English graduates’ accomplishments include the following:

  • Nationally acclaimed, Tony-Award winning playwright
  • Correspondent for Los Angeles Times; head of National Public Radio News; Dean of Columbia Journalism
  • School Founder and executive director of Posada Community Center, Pueblo, Colorado
  • Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, John Carroll University
  • Nationally acclaimed, Shelley Memorial Award-winning poet
  • Vice President for Advancement, Lewis University
  • Principal, Johnsburg High School, Johnsburg, Illinois
  • Head of Legal Services, Dubuque, IA
  • Science Editor for msnbc.com
  • Earthforce, a nonprofit devoted to environmental education
  • Professor of English, Marietta College
  • Public Relations and Social Media Manager, Loras College
  • Content Producer at NogginLabs; Founder and Fiction Editor of Knee-Jerk literary magazine
  • Production Director and Managing Editor with Guerrero Howe Custom Media; Contributing Writer for
  • Paste Magazine and Alarm Press
  • National Fulbright Scholar; International Student and Scholar Advisor, UW-Platteville
  • Developmental Editor, McGraw-Hill

Other common careers: Law, business, advertising, teaching, academia, publishing, journalism, magazine writing and editing, public relations, library science, technical writing, and many more.

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ENGLISH JANUARY TERM CLASSES

January-Term (or J-Term, as you’ll hear it referred to on campus) offers unique opportunities to focus exclusively on a single course for a three-week term. J-Term courses are particularly experiential, taking students out into the community or engaging them in other hands-on activities. Some J-Term courses travel internationally or domestically, and some stay right here, but all are focused on active learning.

English J-Term courses, typically offered every other year, have included:

Writing the Midwestern Landscape: Students combine digital photography with nature writing in Midwestern winter landscapes. The instructor leads students on snowshoeing hikes at Mines of Spain and Swiss Valley nature reserves as part of the writing process. Students’ photo-essay projects have included environmental issues related to the Mississippi River, historical studies of Native Americans and miners in the area, and more.

Poetry in Performance: An in-depth study of lyric poetry for students who want to approach the subject in an experiential way. Students develop their understanding and appreciation for poetry by doing close readings of poems, writing creative and critical essays based on these close readings, and making poetry physically part of themselves through memorization and performance. They learn to read aloud and recite poems in a way that develops their expressiveness and other public speaking skills. Topics include the application of fundamental topics in poetics, including imagery, trope, lineation, syntax, tone, sound, prosody, and the concepts of speaker and addressee.

Native Voices, Native Lives: This experiential learning course engages students in reading, writing and reflecting upon a variety of Native American voices and experiences (Cherokee, Navajo, Lakota, Dakota, Ojibwe, Pah-Ute, Spokane, Ho-Chunk, etc.). Students immerse themselves in the novels, short stories, myths, poetry, and oral histories of Native American people, in order to expand and deepen their understanding of cultural voice. Students spend the second week learning directly from native people as the class travels to experience tribal history and culture first hand. Students’ final projects integrate the texts and experiences of the course into a researched and reflective product. Daily discussions, journaling, and mini-service projects in the community are part of the overall on-site learning experience.

Witchcraft in Early Modern British Literature: This course immerses students in the literary and cultural depiction of witchcraft and those accused of it in early modern Britain. Students read and discuss primary texts (ranging from Shakespeare plays to early modern tracts on witchcraft) and secondary texts (historical research). The course’s experiential component is a witch trial reacting game.

Ireland in Film: This course surveys a wide-range of Irish-themed films in order to develop a deeper understanding of modern Irish cultural identity. Major thematic areas explored in the course include representations of the Irish West, the political struggle for independence, the role of Catholicism in Irish society, and the status of minority groups such as the Irish travelers and the urban working class in Ireland. Students debate the selections for, and plan, an Irish film festival.

Bleak House in Context: An in-depth study of a major British novel and author: Charles Dickens’ Bleak House. Students read the novel in context: in the installment form (available in the Special Collections of the Loras College library), alongside other Victorian publications and cultural artifacts, and through “contact” with the Victorians via role play. The course simulates the Victorian methodology of reading narratives in serial format. Students generate a class e-periodical which involves assuming the “roles” or voices of particular Victorian figures as found through their wider reading in the Special Collections resources of All the Year Round and Household Words (both journals edited by Dickens), the Newgate Journal and other Victorian texts. They also present their research, role play, and reading experiences in the display cases outside the Special Collections room.

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ENGLISH MAJORS EARN FOUR AWARDS IN DELTA EPSILON SIGMA NATIONAL WRITING COMPETITION

Loras College English majors continued their long history of success in the Delta Epsilon Sigma National Undergraduate Writing Competition.  Loras writers have won or received Honorable Mention for 25 straight years, but 2016 has proved particularly fruitful with an unprecedented three first-place finishes and an honorable mention:

  • First Place, Creative Nonfiction: “Searching for Orion,” Noelle Henneman (’16);
  • First Place, Critical Essay: “An Exploration of Wakefield’s Exterior Reflecting his Inner Self,” Mary Agnoli (’15);
  • First Place, Poetry: “Thou Dost Breathe,” Hallie Hayes (’14)
  • Honorable Mention, Fiction: “Drifting,” Logan Miller (’16)

Each of these four works were recipients of the Alpha Award (Best-of-Genre) in the 2015 issue of Loras College’s  Limestone Review.

Congratulations to all of our winners–past, present, and future!  We are proud of you!

-The English Faculty
Read Full Story Here

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ENGLISH EDUCATION STUDENTS PRESENT AT ASSOCIATION OF TEACHER EDUCATORS CONFERENCE

Loras College students Anna Speltz (’15) (Minneota, Minnesota), Nora Zerante (’15) (Chicago Heights, Illinois), Holly Klein (’15) (Dubuque, Iowa), Megan Redmond (’15) (Bernard, Iowa) and Molly Cain (’14) were the only undergraduate team accepted to present at the 2015 Annual Association of Teacher Educators (ATE) conference Phoenix, Arizona in February.

The students presented “ Rooted in Collaboration: Engaging Middle School Students through Poetry,” a collaborative poetry unit that they planned and taught at Washington Middle School in Dubuque, Iowa in the fall of 2013 as a part of their English Methods course, taught by Hilarie Welsh, Ph.D., assistant professor of education.

“The conference was an incredible opportunity to be inspired by some of the most accomplished thinkers and leaders in the education field,” said Speltz. “I came away from the conference with new ideas to apply to my current student teaching experience and better understanding of some of the discussions that are currently relevant in the education field. Presenting in and attending other sessions at the conference helped me to see myself as a contributor in those discussions.”

The team’s presentation shared how they used a required pre-service teachers’ course to collaboratively create and present a six-lesson poetry unit to a middle school honors class, showing the advantages of student-centered strategies and social justice themes, as well as the motivation created through the use of classroom texts and theories. An important component of the presentation was the students’ desire to encourage questions and discussion about the strengths, limitations and potential implications of their collaborative project.

“Dr. Welsh encouraged us to submit a proposal to the conference. Without her support and encouragement, we never would have even considered the opportunity,” explained Speltz.

The Association of Teacher Educators was founded in 1920 and is an individual membership organization devoted solely to the improvement of teacher education both for school-based and post-secondary teacher educators. ATE members represent over 700 colleges and universities, over 500 major school systems, and the majority of state departments of education. The ATE office is located in the Washington DC area where it represents its members’ interests before governmental agencies and education organizations. In addition, ATE has representatives on the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP).

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Major Requirements

Division of Language & Literature
Susan Stone, Ph.D., Chair

Double major in Literature & Creative Writing:
Students must complete 33 literature credits plus Senior Literature Capstone and 18 creative writing credits plus Senior Thesis Seminar. Literature majors will be required to defend their Literature Capstone thesis.

Requirements for the major in English: Creative Writing (B.A.):
The thesis will be examined by a board of English faculty.

Req Course Cr’s
Select four courses from either Req 1a & 1b, 1b & 1c, or 1a & 1c
1a   L.ENG-237: Fiction Writing 3
1a   L.ENG-384: Advanced Fiction Writing 3
1b   L.ENG-238: Poetry Writing 3
1b   L.ENG-385: Advanced Poetry Writing 3
1c   L.ENG-236: Writing the Midwest Landscape 3
1c   L.ENG-239: Creative Nonfiction Writing-AA 3
1c   L.ENG-380: Nature Writing 3
1c   **L.ENG-383: Nonfiction Literature & Workshop 3
2   Elective: One additional L.ENG writing course at 236 or higher 3
3   Elective: One additional L.ENG writing course at 236 or higher 3
4   L.ENG-210: Literary Studies 3
5   L.ENG-200+: One additional non-AGE Literature course 3
6   L.ENG-200+: One additional non-AGE Literature course 3
7   L.ENG-200+: One additional non-AGE Literature course 3
8   L.ENG-468: Literary Criticism 3
9   L.ENG-491: Senior Thesis Seminar-PJ 3
10   L.ENG-491D: Senior Thesis Defense 0
**highly recommended as part of Req 1C
36 total required credits

 
Requirements for the major in English: Literature (B.A.):
Students will be required to defend their Literature Capstone thesis.

Req Course Cr’s
1   L.ENG-210: Literary Studies 3
Select one from Req 2 (Diversity)
2   L.ENG-221: World Literature: Beginnings to Middle Ages 3
2   L.ENG-222: World Literature: Renaissance to Modern 3
2   L.ENG-224: African American Literature 3
2   L.ENG-253: Native Voices, Native Lives 3
2   L.ENG-285: Modern Irish Culture & Literature 3
2   L.ENG-348: Post-Colonial Literature in English 3
Select one from Req 3 (British Literature, pre-1800)
3   L.ENG-337: Medieval and Renaissance British Lit 3
3   L.ENG-351: Milton & 17th Century Literature 3
3   L.ENG-352: 18th Century British Literature 3
Select two from Req 4 (British Literature, 1800 to Present)
4   L.ENG-340: Romantic Age: 1798-1832 3
4   L.ENG-341: Victorian Age: 1832-1901 3
4   L.ENG-342: Victorian Age Novel 3
4   L.ENG-343: British/Irish Poetry 1900-Present 3
4   L.ENG-344: British Fiction 1900-Present 3
4   L.ENG-345: British Drama 1890-Present 3
4   L.ENG-355: English Novel: 1800-1840 3
Select two from Req 5 (American Literature)
5   L.ENG-224: African American Literature 3
5   L.ENG-325: American Literature: 1820-1860 3
5   L.ENG-326: American Literature: 1861-1900 3
5   L.ENG-328: American Lit: Modern & Contemporary Poetry 3
5   L.ENG-329: American Lit: Modern/Contemporary Drama 3
5   L.ENG-330: American Lit: Modern Prose 1900-1945 3
5   L.ENG-331: Am Lit: Contemporary Prose 1945-Present 3
Select one from Req 6 (Major Figures)
6   L.ENG-332: Major American Authors 3
6   L.ENG-333: Shakespeare Before 1600 3
6   L.ENG-334: Shakespeare After 1600 3
6   L.ENG-346: British Major Figures 1900-Present 3
6   L.ENG-351: Milton & 17th-Century Literature 3
7   L.ENG-200+: One additional non-AGE 200+ Literature course 3
8   L.ENG-200+: One additional non-AGE 200+ Literature course 3
9   L.ENG-468: Literary Criticism 3
10   L.ENG-490: Senior Literature Capstone-PJ 3
11   L.ENG-490D: Senior Literature Capstone Defense 0
36 total required credits

 
Requirements for the minor in English:
Only one general education course may be applied to the minor in English.
 

Req Course Cr’s
Select one from Req 2 (British Literature)
1   L.ENG-333: Shakespeare Before 1600 3
1   L.ENG-334: Shakespeare After 1600 3
1   L.ENG-337: Medieval and Renaissance British Lit 3
1   L.ENG-340: Romantic Age: 1798-1832 3
1   L.ENG-341: Victorian Age: 1832-1901 3
1   L.ENG-342: Victorian Age Novel 3
1   L.ENG-343: British/Irish Poetry 1900-Present 3
1   L.ENG-344: British Fiction 1900-Present 3
1   L.ENG-345: British Drama 1890-Present 3
1   L.ENG-346: British Major Figures 1900-Present 3
1   L.ENG-351: Milton & 17th Century Literature 3
1   L.ENG-352: 18th Century British Literature 3
1   L.ENG-355: English Novel: 1800-1840 3
Select one from Req 2 (American Literature)
2   L.ENG-224: African American Literature 3
2   L.ENG-325: American Literature: 1820-1860 3
2   L.ENG-326: American Literature: 1861-1900 3
2   L.ENG-328: American Lit: Modern & Contemporary Poetry 3
2   L.ENG-329: American Lit: Modern/Contemporary Drama 3
2   L.ENG-330: American Lit: Modern Prose 1900-1945 3
2   L.ENG-331: Am Lit: Contemporary Prose 1945-Present 3
2   L.ENG-332: Major American Authors 3
Select one from Req 3 (Writing)
3   L.ENG-236: Writing the Midwest Landscape 3
3   L.ENG-237: Fiction Writing 3
3   L.ENG-238: Poetry Writing 3
3   L.ENG-239: Creative Nonfiction Writing-AA 3
3   L.ENG-370: Fantastic Fiction 3
3   L.ENG-371: Screenwriting 3
3   L.ENG-383: Nonfiction Literature and Workshop 3
3   L.ENG-384: Advanced Fiction Writing 3
3   L.ENG-385: Advanced Poetry Writing 3
3   L.ENG-389: Revision, Editing, and Publishing 3
4   Elective: One additional L.ENG course at 200 or higher 3
5   Elective: One additional L.ENG course at 200 or higher 3
6   Elective: One additional L.ENG course at 200 or higher 3
18 total required credits

 
Requirements for the minor in Rhetoric & Public Writing: 
Students should contact the Center for Experiential Learning for internship possibilities.

 Req   Course Cr’s
1   L.ENG-2XX: TBD 3
2   L.ENG-2XX: TBD 3
3   L.ENG-2XX: TBD 3
4   L.ENG-3XX: TBD 3
 Select one from Req 5
5   L.ENG-236: Writing the Midwest Landscape 3
5   L.ENG-237: Fiction Writing 3
5   L.ENG-238: Poetry Writing 3
5   L.ENG-239: Creative Nonfiction Writing-AA 3
5   L.ENG-380: Nature Writing 3
5   L.ENG-382: Writing Seminar 3
5   L.ENG-383: Nonfiction Literature and Workshop 3
5   L.ENG-384: Advanced Fiction Writing 3
5   L.ENG-385: Advanced Poetry Writing 3
5   L.ENG-389: Revision, Editing, and Publishing 3
5   L.CIT-322, L.CIT-323, L.CIT-324: (three one-credit courses) 3
5   L.COM-164: Digital Imaging 3
5   L.COM-204: Organizational Communication 3
5   L.COM-262: Photojournalism 3
5   L.COM-264: Desktop Publishing 3
 Select one from Req 6
 6   L.PHI-314: Computers, Ethics, and Society 3
 6   L.POL-101: Issues in American Politics 3
 6   L.POL-121: Issues in Global Politics 3
 6   L.POL-201: Campaigns & Elections 3
 6   L.POL-203: The Road to the White House 3
 6   L.PSY-190: The Working Poor 3
 6   L.REL-221: The Church’s Social Teachings 3
 6   L.SOC-254: Race & Ethnicity 3
 6   L.SOC-216: Social Problems 3
 6   L.SOC-375: Social Movements 3
 6   L.SPW-285: Asset Mapping Iowa Latinos 3
  7   Internship through the Center for Experiential Learning 3
21 total required credits

 
ENGLISH: CREATIVE WRITING
L.ENG-150: Composing with Video
L.ENG-236: Writing the Midwest Landscape
L.ENG-237: Fiction Writing
L.ENG-238: Poetry Writing
L.ENG-239: Creative Nonfiction Writing-AA
L.ENG-254: Travel Writing: Guatemala & Int’l Service
L.ENG-380: Nature Writing
L.ENG-382: Writing Seminar
L.ENG-383: Nonfiction Literature & Workshop
L.ENG-384: Advanced Fiction Writing
L.ENG-385: Advanced Poetry Writing
L.ENG-389: Revision, Editing & Publishing
L.ENG-491: Senior Thesis Seminar-PJ
 
FOUNDATIONAL WRITING
L.ENG-111: Critical Writing-FW
 
ENGLISH: LITERATURE
L.ENG-201: Poetry in Performance
L.ENG-221: World Literature: Beginnings to Middle Ages
L.ENG-222: World Literature: Renaissance to Modern
L.ENG-224: African American Literature
L.ENG-225: Literature of Oppression and Resistance-AC
L.ENG-231: Short Fiction-AA
L.ENG-232: The Novel-AA
L.ENG-233: Drama-AA
L.ENG-235: The Revisionist Superhero-AA
L.ENG-240: The Nature of Nature in Ireland-AI
L.ENG-242: Chicago Literature-AA
L.ENG-248: Caribbean, African, Asian Literature of Identity-AI
L.ENG-251: Literature of the Frontier & American West-AA
L.ENG-252: The Law in American Film & Fiction-AA
L.ENG-253: Native Voices, Native Lives
L.ENG-255: All for One, One for All-AI
L.ENG-264: American Literature: The Search for Identity-AA
L.ENG-275: Bleak House in Context
L.ENG-273: The Gothic Imagination-AC
L.ENG-274: Irish Gothic-AC
L.ENG-275: Witchcraft in Early Modern British Literature
L.ENG-285: Modern Irish Literature & Culture
L.ENG-286: Ireland in Film
L.ENG-290: Canadian Imagination-AC
L.ENG-325: American Literature: 1820-1860
L.ENG-326: American Literature: 1861-1900
L.ENG-328: American Literature: Modern & Contemporary Poetry
L.ENG-329: American Literature: Modern & Contemporary Drama
L.ENG-330: American Literature: Modern Prose, 1900-1945
L.ENG-331: American Literature: Contemporary Prose, 1945-Present
L.ENG-332: Major American Authors
L.ENG-333: Shakespeare Before 1600
L.ENG-334: Shakespeare After 1600
L.ENG-337: Medieval & Renaissance British Literature
L.ENG-340: Romantic Age: 1798-1832
L.ENG-341: Victorian Age: 1832-1901
L.ENG-342: Victorian Age Novel
L.ENG-343: British/Irish Poetry 1900-Present
L.ENG-344: British Fiction 1900-Present
L.ENG-345: British Drama 1890-Present
L.ENG-346: Seminar: British Major Figures 1900-Present
L.ENG-348: Post-Colonial Literature in English
L.ENG-351: Milton & 17th Century Literature
L.ENG-352: 18th Century British Literature
L.ENG-355: English Novel: 1800-1840
 
THEORY AND APPLICATION
L.ENG-210: Literary Studies
L.ENG-391: Language Theory & Teaching of Writing
L.ENG-468: Literary Criticism
L.ENG-490: Senior Literature Capstone-PJ

Course Descriptions

L.ENG-111: Critical Writing-FW
A writing course which includes the analysis of short and/or long fiction, creative non-fiction, and emerging forms of public and/or popular culture writing, this class also stresses persuasion, argumentation, and research. Fulfills college writing requirement for students of advanced standing in English. Prerequisite: advanced standing in English. 3 credits.

L.ENG-150: Composing with Video
A multi-modal composition course focusing on script writing and turning finished scripts into brief (4-8 minute) movies. It is a hands-on course that requires creativity. Students will create and edit movies using contemporary digital software. No prior knowledge of script writing and/or movie making is needed in order to enroll in the course. L.ENG-150 is not applicable to the Creative Writing major, Literature major, or English minor. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-201: Poetry in Performance
This is an in-depth study of lyric poetry for students who want to approach the subject in an experiential way. Students will develop their understanding and appreciation for poetry by doing close readings of poems, writing critical essays based on these close readings, and making poetry physically part of themselves through memorization and performance. They will learn to read aloud and recite poems in a way that develops their expressiveness and other public speaking skills. Topics will include the application of fundamental topics in poetics, including imagery, trope, lineation, syntax, tone, sound, prosody, and the concepts of speaker and addressee. Prerequisites: L.LIB-105 or L.LIB-110. Recommended: at least one college-level literature course. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-210: Literary Studies
In this course students will be stimulated to think about the purpose and value of studying literature, and introduced to the interpretive reading skills and critical vocabulary of basic textual analysis (i.e. close reading, and structural and formalist analysis). Students will learn to write about the elements of literature, including, for example, plot, character, setting, ideas, point of view, imagery, metaphor, symbolism, allegory, and prosody. The course also introduces students to contextual analysis. It emphasizes practical instruction in writing critical essays, and is writing-intensive. Newly declared English majors should take this course the first semester it is offered after they declare, if they have not taken it already. 3 credits.

L.ENG-221: World Literature: Beginnings to Middle Ages
Selected works from classical Greece, India and China, and from medieval Arabia, Europe and Japan. 3 credits. Spring semesters of odd numbered years.

L.ENG-222: World Literature: Renaissance to Modern
Selected works from European, Native and Latin American, African, South Asian and Asian cultures. 3 credits. Spring semesters of even numbered years.

L.ENG-224: African American Literature
This course surveys nineteenth- and twentieth- century African American literature. Poetry, speeches, fiction, folk tales, song, essays and autobiography will be examined, and an experiential, community-based component will be incorporated. 3 credits.

L.ENG-225: Literature of Oppression and Resistance-AC
This course examines literary works from various social and historical contexts that address issues of oppression and resistance, focusing especially on literature that reflects the experience of colonialism. Representative works include Shakespeare’s Tempest, Aime Cesaire’s A Tempest, Joyce’s Dubliners, Albert Camus’s A Plague, Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-231: Short Fiction-AA
A course in the genre of short fiction: possibilities, varieties, structures and types. Authors vary. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-232: The Novel-AA
A course in the genre of the novel: possibilities, varieties, structures, and types. Authors vary. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-233: Drama-AA
The course will provide students with an introduction to the reading and study of drama, including structure, dramatic strategies, symbolism, thematic analysis, and stage craft. Plays selected are at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-235: The Revisionist Superhero-AA
In this course students will first learn the boundaries and cultural expectations of elements of the traditional superhero narrative; then, the course will engage some of the major texts that challenge those expectations, as well as the deep and rich body of associated criticism that places those texts in an aesthetic and cultural context. The texts used in this course have been selected specifically because they are widely-viewed as stories that transcend their genre, and thus are recognized as a fine art form in and of themselves. Students will examine the evolution of the super-hero genre that began with the inception of “superhero revisionism” in the early 1980s, particularly in terms of the way these former four-color characters have been transformed in terms of character, visual styling, and most importantly, the stories told about them. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-236: Writing the Midwest Landscape
An introductory creative nonfiction workshop course specifically focused on the Midwest landscape. Students will write, workshop, and revise two works of creative nonfiction, including one memoir/narrative and one literary journalism essay. In addition, students will: read published works of creative nonfiction; write literary analyses focusing on techniques of creative nonfiction; participate in three required local winter hikes/photography-shoots; and deliver a photo-essay presentation involving a reading of their creative work with a backdrop of digital photography. Prerequisite: L.LIB-105. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-237: Fiction Writing
An introductory creative writing class focused on the short story. The class is conducted as a workshop/seminar of approximately 15 students, with heavy emphasis on student-composed fiction. To complete the course, students must write three short stories for a cumulative total of at least 25 final pages, participate actively in class, and critique other students’ work in writing. Prerequisites: L.LIB-105 or L.ENG-111. 3 credits.

L.ENG-238: Poetry Writing
An introductory workshop course in the art of writing poetry, and an introduction to poetics. Students will develop techniques for writing vivid descriptions and figures of speech, using precise diction, achieving rhythm and other pleasurable sound effects, deploying the energy of syntax, choosing rhetorical moods for emotional effect, and writing satisfying endings. Prerequisites: L.LIB-105, or L.ENG-111. 3 credits

L.ENG-239: Creative Nonfiction Writing-AA
An introductory level workshop in which students write and receive feedback on creative nonfiction essay forms. Students also analyze the writing techniques of published authors. Editing workshops focus on stylistic polish. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-240: The Nature of Nature in Ireland-AI
This course examines how the people of Ireland have established identity in relation to the landscape they inhabit. Topics include the Neolithic, Celtic, and early Christian Irish people’s interactions with nature, and the impact of British colonial occupation and modern commercialism on Irish identity with the landscape. Sources are literary and informational. A final project has students exam identity and community in its relationship to their own local landscape. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-242: Chicago Literature-AA
Students will read, analyze, discuss, and study novels, stories, plays, and poems set in whole or in large part in Chicago. Readings include novels, stories, plays, poems, and primary non-fiction documents. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-248: Caribbean, African, Asian Literature of Identity-AI
Literature in English from the current and former British Empire excluding the British Isles; emphasis on the Third World. Demonstrates how literature shapes and reflects the identities of emerging Caribbean, African, and Asian nations. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-251: Literature of the Frontier & American West-AA
Students will focus on and discuss the aesthetic and cultural significance of the literature of discovery, conflict, adventure, and travel in the land west of the Mississippi River. They will examine the relationships between non-fiction (i.e., personal narratives, newspaper writing, diaries, letters, and travel logs) and fiction (short stories, myths and legends, oral narratives, and novels). Students will also explore the ways in which genre, environment, language and bilingualism, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, and personal politics all shape, reflect, and restrict artistic expression during the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries. Representative authors: Bret Hart, Mark Twain, Willa Cather, Ambrose Bierce, Mary Hunter Austin, Stephen Crane, Zane Grey, Frank Norris, Hamlin Garland, Zitkala-Sa, Kate Chopin, and Laura Ingalls Wilder. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-252: The Law in American Film & Fiction-AA
Students will study “the law” in American literature and film, focusing on the issues and consequences of creating, breaking, enforcing, and challenging “the law” and/or “legal” system(s). They will consider the relationships between legal literature/film and such issues as humanity, justice, love, ethics, citizenship, community, criminality, victimhood, environment, revenge, and social responsibility. They will also participate in a mock trial. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-253: Native Voices, Native Lives
This experiential learning course engages students in reading, writing and reflecting upon a variety of Native American voices and experiences (Cherokee, Navajo, Lakota, Dakota, Ojibwe, Pah-Ute, Spokane, Ho-Chunk, etc.). Students will immerse themselves in the novels, short stories, myths, poetry, and oral histories of Native American people, in order to expand and deepen their understanding of cultural voice. Students will spend the second week learning directly from native people as the class travels to experience tribal history and culture first hand. Students’ final projects will integrate the texts and experiences of the course into a researched and reflective product. Daily discussions, journaling, and mini-service projects in the community will be part of the overall on-site learning experience. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100; either L.LIB-105 or L.LIB-110. Instructor’s permission required. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-254: Travel Writing: Guatemala & Int’l Service
This course is both a study travel course and a community-based learning course. This Travel Writing service course to Guatemala is an introductory level workshop in which students write and receive feedback on creative nonfiction essay forms based on primary and secondary research. The thematic focus for the course is on citizenship and international service. Students will analyze the writing techniques of published authors; research secondary sources related to ideas about service, citizenship, and Guatemala’s political and social experiences with foreign aid; and create a travel narrative that defines service and reflects on their service experiences. Editing workshops will teach stylistic elements and focus on the process of writing. Students will spend 10 days in Guatemala, 5 of which will be spent in a Mayan village in the mountains near Semachaca where we will be finishing a building project—the construction of a medical clinic. The other 5 days will be spent visiting cultural sites to gain more cultural context and to conduct research for your travel narrative. Our on-campus work—5 days before and after our visit to Guatemala—will include talks given by former Peace Corps volunteers and other service agencies; cultural and historical research on Guatemala; discussions of travel narratives written by volunteers who worked in Guatemala; and writing and editing workshops that will walk you through the creative writing process. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-255: All for One, One for All-AI
An investigation into questions surrounding the responsibilities of the individual to the community as evident in the work of three Nobel prize-winning authors- Francois Mauriac, Albert Camus and Samuel Beckett. We will examine the notions of choice, free will, personal identity and faith and discuss ways in which these notions function within the framework of the novels/plays chosen for the semester. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135 or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-264: American Literature: The Search for Identity-AA
A thematic course in American literature, focusing on the search for identity as evidenced in literature. Recent themes have included Male/Female identities, War & Peace, Healing & Searching, and Ego & Shadow. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-270: Bleak House in Context
This course is an in-depth study course on a major British novel and author-Charles Dickens’ Bleak House. Students will read the novel in context: in the installment form (fortunately available in the Special Collections of Loras’ ARC), alongside other Victorian publications and cultural artifacts, and through “contact” with the Victorians via role play. The course will simulate the Victorian methodology of reading narratives in serial format. Students will generate a class e-periodical which involves assuming the “roles” or voices of particular Victorian figures as found through their wider reading in the Special Collections resources of All the Year Round and Household Words (both journals edited by Dickens), the Newgate Journal and other Victorian texts. They will also have the opportunity to present their research, role play, and reading experiences in the display cases outside of the Special Collection room in the ARC. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-273: The Gothic Imagination-AC
This course begins with a study of the cultural and historical events of the late eighteenth century that led into the development of the Gothic imagination, especially the rise of Romanticism and revolution. Specific primary works, including fiction, art, and film, will vary from semester to semester, but will be ordered chronologically to allow students to trace the evolution of the Gothic form. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-274: Irish Gothic-AC
This course will first explore the reasons for which the Gothic tradition, with its literary roots in Walpole and Radcliffe and its political roots in the French Revolution, found fertile ground in the Anglo-Irish culture of the nineteenth century. Then it will investigate the evolution of that tradition in the works of selected writers: Maria Edgeworth, Charles Maturin, Sheridan Le Fanu, and Bram Stoker. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-275: Witchcraft in Early Modern British Literature
This three-credit course is a single topic course designed as an initial immersion in the subject of the literary and cultural depiction of witchcraft and those accused of it in early modern Britain. Students will read and discuss primary texts (ranging from Shakespeare plays to early modern tracts on witchcraft) and secondary texts (historical research). The course’s experiential component is in the form of a witch trial reacting game. Prerequisite: L.LIB-220. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-277: Rhetoric & Political Engagement
This discussion-based course surveys key rhetorical theories relevant to twenty-first century argumentation and cultural critique with an emphasis on how they are reflected in the American democratic process. These concepts find practical application as tools for analyzing rhetoric found in contemporary political campaigns. Restriction: Not open to first-year students. Prerequisite: L.LIB-105 or L.ENG-111. 3 credits.

L.ENG-285: Modern Irish Literature & Culture
The course undertakes a literary oriented investigation and interrogation of modern Irish culture. Through the reading and discussion of selected 19th and 20th century Irish literary works, students in the course will explore various essential aspects of Irish communal life in order to apprehend the continuity and transformation of Irish culture over the last two centuries. Topics covered will include family structure, religious practice, economic conditions, education, attitudes toward land and language, relationships between the colonized and the colonizers, between classes, between sectarian groups. Representative authors include William Carleton, Lady Gregory, William Butler Years, J. M. Synge, James Joyce, Sean O’Casey, Brian Friel, Seamus Heaney, Eavan Boland. 3 credits.

L.ENG-286: Ireland in Film
This course surveys a wide-range of Irish-themed films in order to develop a deeper understanding of modern Irish cultural identity. Major thematic areas explored in the course include representations of the Irish West, the political struggle for independence, the role of Catholicism in Irish society, the status of minority groups such as the Irish travelers and the urban working class in Ireland. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-290: Canadian Imagination-AC
A study of how geography and history have influenced the development of Canadian culture. We will study literature and film from Canada’s diverse cultures, both in English and in translation from French and aboriginal languages, in relation to key concepts in Canadian cultural studies. Major themes include the various social and psychological effects of imperialism and colonialism, especially with regard to national identity, ethnic, religious and cultural minorities, and gender and class relations, as well as the various imaginative strategies Canadians have used to overcome these effects. Representative authors: Alice Munro, Mavis Gallant, Robertson Davies. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-325: American Literature: 1820-1860
This course surveys the literature and culture of the American Renaissance, focusing on the Romantic and Transcendental writers and texts, as well as on the literature of Abolition and of women’s rights. Short stories, novels, creative non-fiction, essays, and political documents will be examined. Representative authors: Hawthorne, Poe, Emerson, Sedgwick, Melville, Thoreau, Stowe, Dickinson, Fuller, Whitman. 3 credits.

L.ENG-326: American Literature: 1861-1900
This course surveys the literature and culture of the Civil War and Reconstruction era, focusing on the slave narrative, Realism, Naturalism, Children’s fiction, and the American Gothic. Psychology, gender, race, class, religion, and other themes are considered as they influenced writers and literature from the time period. Representative authors: Howells, Alcott, Twain, James, Crane, Chopin, Gillman. 3 credits.

L.ENG-328: American Literature: Modern & Contemporary Poetry
Representative poets: Robert Frost, Marianne Moore, T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Hayden, Amy Clampitt. This course uses experiential performance techniques as well as traditional scholarly analysis and context to engage with poetry in a fully human way, using intellect, imagination, emotion and the body. 3 credits.

L.ENG-329: American Literature: Modern & Contemporary Drama
Representative dramatists: O’Neill, Glaspell, Hellman, Williams, Shange, Miller, Albee, Rabe, Wilson, Howe, Wasserstein. 3 credits.

L.ENG-330: American Literature: Modern Prose, 1900-1945
Representative authors: Wharton, Dreiser, Cather, Stein, Anderson, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Wright, Porter. 3 credits.

L.ENG-331: American Literature: Contemporary Prose, 1945-Present
Representative authors: Ellison, Baldwin, Malamud, Bellow, Welty, Carver, Cheever, Oates, Tyler, Mason, Walker, Morrison, Kincaid. 3 credits.

L.ENG-332: Major American Authors
A study of significant authors, their texts and recent critical biographies. Authors vary. Students may take this course twice, for different authors. 3 credits.

L.ENG-333: Shakespeare Before 1600
This is a chronologically-organized, cross-genre exploration of Shakespeare’s earlier drama. This course will cover his comedies, histories, and tragedies up to about 1600. The plays will be a selection (subject to change) from the following: The Comedy of Errors, Richard III, Titus Andronicus, The Taming of the Shrew, Romeo and Juliet, Richard II, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Henry IV parts I and II, Much Ado about Nothing, Julius Caesar, and As You Like It. 3 credits.

L.ENG-334: Shakespeare After 1600
This is a chronologically-organized, cross-genre exploration of Shakespeare’s later drama. This course will cover his comedies, tragedies and romances starting at about 1600. The plays will be a selection (subject to change) from the following:Hamlet, Twelfth Night, Troilus and Cressida, All’s Well That Ends Well, Measure for Measure, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, Coriolanus, Cymbeline, The Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest. 3 credits.

L.ENG-337: Medieval & Renaissance British Literature
A study of British literature from Beowulf to Spenser, in modern translation from Irish, Welsh, Latin, French, and Old and Middle English, as well as some in the original Middle English and much in early modern English. Representative authors: Bede, the Beowulf-poet, Marie de France, Langland, Chaucer, the Gawain-poet, Malory, Julian of Norwich, More, Skelton, Wyatt, Surrey, Raleigh, Campion, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare. 3 credits.

L.ENG-340: Romantic Age: 1798-1832
A study of English romantic theory and practice. Representative authors: Blake, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Coleridge, P. Shelley, M. Shelley, Keats. 3 credits.

L.ENG-341: Victorian Age: 1832-1901
A study of the poetry and prose of the age. Representative authors: Carlyle, Mill, Tennyson, Browning, Barrett Browning, Arnold, C. Rossetti, Ruskin. 3 credits.

L.ENG-342: Victorian Age Novel
Focuses primarily on the Victorian Age novel. Representative authors: Brontes, Dickens, Collins, Eliot, Hardy. 3 credits.

L.ENG-343: British/Irish Poetry 1900-Present
Representative authors: W.B. Yeats, Wilfred Owen, T.S. Eliot, Patrick Kavanagh, W.H. Auden, Stevie Smith, Philip Larkin, Seamus Heaney, Eavan Boland. 3 credits.

L.ENG-344: British Fiction 1900-Present
Representative authors: Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Huxley, Greene, Rhys, Lessing, Fowles, Byatt. 3 credits.

L.ENG-345: British Drama 1890-Present
Representative authors: Wilde, Shaw, Osborne, Delaney, Beckett, Pinter, Stoppard, Shaffer. 3 credits.

L.ENG-346: Seminar: British Major Figures 1900-Present
A seminar focusing on one or several English writers of poetry, fiction or drama. 3 credits.

L.ENG-348: Post-Colonial Literature in English
Literature in English from the current and former British Empire excluding the British Isles; emphasis on the Third World. Representative authors: Achebe, Okri, Head, Naipaul, Narayan, Rushdie, Soyinka, Walcott. 3 credits.

L.ENG-349: Writers for the 21st Century
A focused study of 21st century writers through themes and/or genre. 3 credits.

L.ENG-351: Milton & 17th Century Literature
A survey of 17th century English poetry with emphasis on Milton’s Paradise Lost. Representative authors include Donne, Herbert, Jonson, Herrick, Lovelace, Marvell, Mary Sidney Wroth, Katherine Philips. 3 credits.

L.ENG-352: 18th Century British Literature
A survey of 18th-century English literature. Representative authors include Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Blake, Mary Wortley Montagu and selected women poets. 3 credits.

L.ENG-355: English Novel: 1800-1840
A study of pre-Victorian trends in the novel. Representative authors include Austen, Edgeworth, Godwin, Scott, Shelley. 3 credits.

L.ENG-370: Fantastic Fiction
A creative writing workshop in which students will study, write, revise and critique genre fiction and/or literary fiction informed by genre tropes. Specifically, the course will focus on science fiction, fantasy, and horror, or work that combines elements of literary fiction with these genres. Students will write three original works which will be submitted to, and critiqued by, the class, in addition to reading a variety of genre fiction with the purpose of learning the conventions of each genre and critiquing one another’s work in formal assignments presented to the class. Lastly, students will learn the protocols of submitting genre work to reputable markets. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, and L.LIB-105 or L.ENG-111. 3 credits.

L.ENG-371: Screenwriting
A writing workshop focusing on the creation, critique, and revision of an original screenplay—in this case, for a short film. This will involve learning the industry-appropriate format and terms and learning the conventions of writing in screenplay form. ENG 371 also carries a critical component, in which students will analyze the themes, techniques, and style of a particular multi-credited screenwriter, and analyze the structure and strengths/weaknesses of an already-produced short film. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, and L.LIB-105 or L.ENG-111. 3 credits.

L.ENG-380: Nature Writing
An advanced-level workshop course in nonfiction nature writing. Students also study technique and theme in contemporary nonfiction nature writing. Representative authors include Dillard, Abbey, Ehrlich, and Bass. Students write analytical and creative works. 3 credits.

L.ENG-382: Writing Seminar
An advanced-level workshop course Topics may vary. May be taken twice, with different topics. 3 credits.

L.ENG-383: Nonfiction Literature & Workshop
An advanced-level workshop in which students write memoir, meditative, and literary journalism essays while analyzing the works of published authors. Representative authors include Capote, Dillard, McCourt, Sanders. 3 credits.

L.ENG-384: Advanced Fiction Writing
An advanced course in the art and craft of writing fiction. Prerequisite: L.ENG-237 or equivalent. May be taken twice. 3 credits.

L.ENG-385: Advanced Poetry Writing
An advanced course in the art and craft of writing poetry, intended for students with strong backgrounds in reading, writing and critiquing poetry. Prerequisite: L.ENG-238 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. May be taken twice. 3 credits.

L.ENG-389: Revision, Editing & Publishing
An advanced workshop seminar devoted to a detailed study of writing style, grammar and mechanics, based on original and extensively revised student work. Prerequisites: LIB 105; at least one 200-level writing class; highly recommended: one 300-level writing class. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-391: Language Theory & Teaching of Writing
An exploration of language and composition theory, research and pedagogy. Prerequisites: L.LIB-105 or L.ENG-111. Intended for English/Teacher Education majors and others interested in the teaching of writing. 3 credits.

L.ENG-468: Literary Criticism
Theoretical explanation and practical application of central concepts from classical and contemporary literary criticism. Required for all English majors. Ordinarily taken in the junior year. 3 credits.

L.ENG-490: Senior Literature Capstone-PJ
This course is the required capstone for English: Literature majors. It is designed to assist students in demonstrating the transferable knowledge and skills that they have developed through their liberal arts education at Loras College. This is an opportunity for students to refine and expand an essay they have already written. In addition, the course provides students with the opportunity to professionally present their strengths and accomplishments through the development of a cover letter and resume. Completion of College Portfolio. Culminates in Capstone Defense. 3 credits.

L.ENG-490D: Capstone Defense
Students should register for ENG 490D Capstone Defense in the Fall or Spring, whichever semester they will defend the Capstone Project undertaken in ENG 490.  0 credits.

L.ENG-491: Senior Thesis Seminar-PJ
Students will workshop thesis drafts and reflective essay in a workshop setting in consultation with a thesis director. Culminates in Thesis Defense. Restrictions: Senior status, English: Creative Writing majors only. 3 credits.

L.ENG-491D: Thesis Defense
Students should register for ENG 491D Thesis Defense in the Fall or Spring, whichever semester they will defend the creative thesis undertaken in ENG 491.  0 credits.

RELATED COURSES: Spanish, Spanish-Speaking World

English Alumni Newsletter

The Loras College English Newsletter is intended to connect alumni of Loras College’s Language and Literature division with their peers, faculty and students. The newsletter provides updates and information on alums, current student achievements and experiences, faculty recognition, program developments and recent news.

Career Opportunities

After receiving your degree from Loras, your career could take off in one of these fields:

  • Creative writing
  • Teaching
  • Screenwriting
  • Journalism
  • Editing
  • Publishing
  • Political writing
  • Freelance writing
  • Technical writing
  • Magazine writing
  • Grant writing
  • Broadcast media
  • Digital media
  • Consulting
  • Advertising
  • Law
Loras College Department Staff

Andrew Auge, Ph.D.
Professor of English
563-588-7218 | Andrew.Auge@loras.edu

Dr. Auge teaches courses in World Literature, Medieval and Renaissance British Literature, Eighteenth Century British Literature, Modern Irish Literature, and Modern Irish & British Poetry. He has published articles on a number of contemporary Irish poets, and his book, A Chastened Communion: Modern Irish Poetry and Catholicism, was published by Syracuse University Press in Fall 2013.

When not reading Irish poetry, Dr. Auge enjoys watching the Chicago White Sox and going for walks with his dog in the woods. After many years of teaching literature, Dr. Auge still finds that it elicits a more intense form of critical thinking than any other discipline.

Naomi Clark, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of English
563-588-7402 | Naomi.Clark@loras.edu

Naomi Clark completed her doctorate in rhetoric and composition (with a minor in women’s and gender studies) at the University of Missouri in 2014. In addition to directing the Writing Center at Loras, Dr. Clark teaches courses in composition (College Writing) and public writing. Her composition courses introduce students to academic writing through exploring food production systems in the context of globalization, and focus on the connections between academic research and students’ everyday lives. Students analyze arguments, develop academic research skills, and write evidence-based responses. Her public writing courses include Rhetoric & Political Engagement, Writing for New Media, Grant & Proposal Writing, and Writing as Social Action, all of them courses that apply rhetorical principles to language practices in the twenty-first century.

In line with her teaching, Dr. Clark’s research traces the circulation of political discourse in the context of the twenty-first century’s network culture. Specifically, she is interested in the ways that ideographs (evocative political terms that reflect a society’s shared beliefs) evolve over time and bridge gaps between otherwise disconnected audiences.

When not working, Dr. Clark enjoys taking yoga classes, baking, travel, and reading Little House books to her two young children.

William Jablonsky, M.F.A.
Associate Professor of English
563-588-7499 | William.Jablonsky@loras.edu

William Jablonsky received an MFA in Creative Writing from Bowling Green State University. While Professor Jablonsky’s main focus is fiction writing, he teaches a wide variety of courses at Loras. In addition to the introductory and advanced fiction workshops, he also offers courses in screenwriting, genre fiction writing (specializing in science fiction, fantasy and horror) and a J-term course focused on finishing your work and sending it to potential publishers.

More recently, Professor Jablonsky taught a course on deconstructionist superhero stories (that is, ones that break the traditional four-color, black-and-white mold). He is the author of a magical realist story collection, The Indestructible Man and a steampunk novel, The Clockwork Man.

Kathleen Jeffries, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Spanish
563-588-7802 | Kathleen.Jeffries@loras.edu

Dr. Jeffries’ areas of scholarly and academic interest include Latino Studies, Spanish for the Professions, translation and interpreting, interdisciplinary cultural and literary studies, and critical theory.

Will Kanyusik, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of English
563-588-7727 | William.Kanyusik@loras.edu

Will Kanyusik teaches courses in Modern and Contemporary American and British prose and drama, as well as courses in college and critical writing. Dr. Kanyusik earned his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota with a focus in Modern American and British Literature. He also holds an M.A. in English from the University of Minnesota, and a B.A. in English from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

His research focuses on the portrayal of gender and disability in twentieth-century literature and culture. He recently contributed a chapter concerning the depiction of disability in the American modernist novel to a disability studies anthology, and has also published scholarship on the depiction of disability in film.

Dr. Kanyusik loves the outdoors, and has been an avid bicyclist for most of his life. He is a voracious reader of all kinds of books, loves film and music, enjoys cooking, and always looks forward to spending time with his family in northern Wisconsin during breaks from teaching.

Kevin Koch, Ph.D.
Professor of English
563-588-7536 | Kevin.Koch@loras.edu

Dr. Koch teaches creative nonfiction courses in the Creative Writing major, with a focus on nature writing. His love for the outdoors carries over into his own writing, including his two published books: Skiing At Midnight: A Nature Journal from Dubuque County, Iowa, and The Driftless Land: Spirit of Place in the Upper Mississippi Valley. Dr. Koch also compiled and edited the book Rising With Christ: Catholic Women’s Voices Across the World, and his work has been published in magazines like The North American Review and Big Muddy. In addition, he writes a monthly outdoors column for a local newspaper.

When Dr. Koch is not teaching or writing, he can be found bicycling, hiking, canoeing or cross-country skiing.

Dana Livingston, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Spanish
563-588-4989 | Dana.Livingston@loras.edu

Dr. Livingston works in Spanish literature (the subject of his Ph.D. from the University of Boulder), intercultural competency (with the Drexler Middle/Intermediate School, City of Dubuque), language proficiency (as an Oral Proficiency Interview and Writing Proficiency Assessment tester in Spanish, fully certified by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages), and in the Aldo Leopold Education Project, an interdisciplinary conservation education program. He also directs FutureTalk, a summer program offering underserved teens meaningful work in nature for a stipend, a rigorous conservation education program, and service-learning opportunities. Dr. Livingston serves on two local boards: Friends of the Mines of Spain and the Multicultural Family Center.

Kate McCarthy-Gilmore, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Spanish
Director of Modes of Inquiry
563-588-7808 | Kate.McCarthy-Gilmore@loras.edu

Dr. McCarthy-Gilmore’s areas of scholarly and academic interest include colonial Latin American literature and gender studies. She is also interested in Asset Mapping, a sustainable means of community development, and she works with students on this topic in January-Term and semester-long courses.

James Pollock, Ph.D.
Professor of English
563-588-7225 | James.Pollock@loras.edu

Dr. Pollock teaches Poetry Writing, Advanced Poetry Writing, Poetry in Performance, Shakespeare Before 1600, Shakespeare After 1600, and Modern & Contemporary American Poetry. He also sometimes teaches Canadian Imagination (a postcolonial cultural studies course on Canadian culture) and the Senior Thesis Seminar in Creative Writing.

He earned an Honors B.A. in English literature and creative writing from York University in Toronto, Canada, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in literature and creative writing from the University of Houston.

Dr. Pollock is the author of the book Sailing to Babylon, a finalist for the Griffin Poetry Prize and the Governor General’s Literary Award in Poetry, runner-up for the Posner Poetry Book Award, and winner of an Outstanding Achievement Award in Poetry from the Wisconsin Library Association; and You Are Here: Essays on the Art of Poetry in Canada, a finalist for the ForeWord Reviews Book of the Year Award for a collection of essays. He is also the editor of The Essential Daryl Hine, a book of selected poems. His poetry has been published in The Paris Review, AGNI, Poetry Daily, the National Post, and other journals in the U.S. and Canada, broadcast on CBC Radio, and listed in Best Canadian Poetry. Several of his poems appear in anthologies, including The Griffin Poetry Prize Anthology 2013, Heart of the Order: Baseball Poems, and Earth and Heaven: An Anthology of Myth Poetry. His critical essays and reviews have appeared in Contemporary Poetry Review, Canadian Notes & Queries, Arc Poetry Magazine, and elsewhere.

In his free time, Dr. Pollock enjoys fitness training, saber fencing, and spending time with his wife and son and the family dog.

Visit him at www.james-pollock.com.

Susan Stone, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of English
Chair of the Division of Language & Literature
563-588-7185 | Susan.Stone@loras.edu

Dr. Stone teaches a wide variety of courses in 19th-century American literature and culture, Gender Studies, Native American and African American Studies, Writing, and other areas, including courses on Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings, law in American literature and film, and her newest MOI—a pop-culture class centered on the hit TV show, “The Big Bang Theory.” Her most recent scholarly work, presented at the annual Modern Language Association conference and published by the University of Georgia Press, has focused on the legacies of women transcendentalists—both traditional and not—including Margaret Fuller and Mary Wilkins Freeman. In addition, she has been invited twice to present her biographical research about the earliest Native Americans to become Catholic priests and nuns at the annual St. Kateri Tekakwitha meeting, the oldest and biggest international conference for the study of Catholicism among Indigenous peoples.

Pedagogically, she believes strongly in class participation, hands-on learning, and having fun. For example, in her J-term class, students don’t just read and write about stories by and about Native American authors. They actually travel to and live on Native reservations, interacting with Native people and experiencing everything from the somewhat expected—that language, education, and storytelling are key to identity and that embracing Native heritage and US military service are both matters of tribal pride—to the extremely unexpected; for example, some tribes use more cutting-edge technology than we do, and some consider muskrat–which she and her students not only ate and found rather tasty but also learned how to cook–a culinary delicacy tied to survival during hard times. These things you just don’t get in a standard classroom.

When she is not preparing rustic (all organic!) wildlife meals over an open fire with her students, teaching, or attending to her responsibilities as the division chairperson, she loves working with Habitat for Humanity, the Literary Society, Dance Marathon, and the Rugby Club. She also enjoys reading, cooking, and spending time with her husband and her cat Freya.

Erin VanLaningham, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of English
563-588-7200 | Erin.VanLaningham@loras.edu

Dr. VanLaningham teaches 19th Century British Literature, Irish Studies, and Women’s Literature. Her British novel courses focus on the ways that detective fiction, the gothic, the Romance and the coming-of-age story transform and create the cultures of the period. She enjoys opportunities to put the books in context by using the Special Collections of the Loras Library, the Dubuque Historical Society, and contemporary film and fiction adaptations. Additional courses she teaches include World Literature and the Irish Gothic.

Dr. VanLaningham’s free time involves spending time outside—skiing, kayaking, gardening or reading.