History

The History program at Loras College combines the personal attention students receive at a small private college with a broad curriculum that is usually available only at a large institution. We offer courses that cover every historical period around the globe. Whether you are interested in ancient, medieval or modern history, or want to concentrate on American, European or non-Western history, you can find relevant courses in our curriculum.

The History program places special emphasis on developing academic skills, such as identifying historical problems that need further inquiry, finding and evaluating primary sources and making an original and sophisticated argument based on the critical investigation of evidence. The historical discipline values these skills as central to becoming an historian, and additionally, the ability to work in a learning community and produce new knowledge through the interpretation of primary materials can be applied to many career choices.

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LORAS PROVIDES A STIMULATING SOCIAL CALENDAR OFFERING STUDENTS A DIVERSE ARRAY OF EVENTS

From clubs and organizations to theater productions, concerts, athletic events, musical performances, intercultural programs, spiritual opportunities, there is so much for students to choose from.

Loras College provides a stimulating social climate for the campus and allows students to enjoy a diverse array of programs and entertainment.

On any given night of the week, students can enjoy a number of social opportunities. From clubs and organizations to theater productions, athletic events, musical performances, intercultural programs and spiritual opportunities, there is so much for students to choose from. In addition, the College Activities Board provides a variety of entertainment including: comedians, game shows, coffeehouses and concerts every weekend.

In addition, the College Activities Board provides a variety of entertainment including: comedians, game shows, coffeehouses and concerts every weekend.

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HISTORY TEACHING ENDORSEMENTS

History students seeking certification to teach in secondary education have a few options:

  • U.S. History endorsement
  • World History endorsement
  • All Social Studies endorsement

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HISTORY MAJOR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The historical discipline values these skills as central to becoming an historian, but the ability to work in a learning community and produce new knowledge through the interpretation of primary materials can be applied to many career choices upon graduation.

Managers, public relations specialists, high school teachers, librarians, public historians, accountants, lawyers and police officers (to name a few of the many careers our graduates choose) benefit from research skills, information literacy, the ability to persuade, proficiency in writing and the self confidence that comes from the public presentation of creative work.

A large proportion of our History graduates are social studies teachers in secondary education, primarily at school districts in Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin. Others have embarked on successful careers in various fields or elected to go to graduate or law school.

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Major Requirements

Division of Philosophical, Religious, Theological, Social & Cultural Studies
Christopher Budzisz, Ph.D., Chair

Requirements for the major in History (B.A.):
Students in the first and sophomore years are advised to select from among 100- and 200-level courses (introductory level courses). Majors, in consultation with a faculty advisor, design a curriculum suited to their particular interests and professional needs.Division approval is required for acceptance as a major, for course distribution within the major, and for graduation. Before the division will consider for approval an application for major, an applicant should have passed three credits in Loras history courses with at least a 2.3 G.P.A. and consulted with the division chair on the requirements for the major. To complete the major, a student must receive at least a C grade in L.HIS-288, L.HIS-489 and L.HIS-490 and maintain at least a 2.3 G.P.A. in 33 credits of History courses taken for the major.

L.HIS-288, 489 and 490 must be taken at Loras College. History majors may apply up to 12 transfer credits toward their Loras degree. Credit will not be granted for online courses that do not require on-campus contact hours.

REQUIRED COURSES WHICH MUST BE TAKEN AT LORAS
L.HIS-175               Themes in World History (Required only for World and All Social Studies Teaching Endorsements)
L.HIS-288               Historical Methods
L.HIS-386               U.S. Survey for Teachers. (Required only for United States and All Social Studies Teaching Endorsements)
L.HIS-489               Seminar for Majors: Interpretations
L.HIS-490               Research Seminar
 

Req Course Cr’s
1   L.HIS-288: Historical Methods 3
2   L.HIS-489: Seminar for Majors: Interpretations 3
3   L.HIS-490: Research Seminar 3
4   Elective: Any L.HIS course 3
5   Elective: Any L.HIS course 3
6   Elective: Any L.HIS course 3
7   Elective: Any L.HIS course 3
8   Elective: Any Non-AGE L.HIS-300+ course 3
9   Elective: Any Non-AGE L.HIS-300+ course 3
10   Elective: Any Non-AGE L.HIS-300+ course 3
11   Elective: Any Non-AGE L.HIS-300+ course 3
33 total required credits

 
Requirements for the minor in History:
Two of the following six electives must be upper (300 or 400) level courses.

Req Course Cr’s
1   Elective: Any World history course 3
2   Elective: Any World history course 3
3   Elective: Any American history course 3
4   Elective: Any American history course 3
5   Elective: Any additional history course 3
6   Elective: Any additional history course 3
18 total required credits

 
AFRICAN HISTORY
L.HIS-161: Modern Africa since 1800
L.HIS-282: History as Film: Africa-AC
L.HIS-360: Southern Africa Since 1800
 
ASIAN HISTORY
L.HIS-272: Japan in the Modern World–AI
L.HIS-275: History As Film: East Asia
L.HIS-277: Modern Chinese History & Culture-AC
 
COMPARATIVE WORLD HISTORY
L.HIS-175: Themes in World History
L.HIS-248: Identity, Community & the Cold War-AI
L.HIS-349: The Second World War
L.HIS-380: The Cold War
L.HIS-392: History as Film
L.HIS-404: Historical Geography
 
EUROPEAN HISTORY
L.HIS-116: Ancient Greek Civilization
L.HIS-117: Roman Civilization
L.HIS-140: Europe To 1750
L.HIS-141: Modern Europe Since 1750
L.HIS-236: Art & Archaeology of Greece & Rome
L.HIS-245: The Celts-AC
L.HIS-249: Russian Civilization-AC
L.HIS-306: Historians of Greece & Rome
L.HIS-329: The Enlightenment
L.HIS-330: The French Revolution
L.HIS-340: The Age of Kings & Conversions: Medieval Europe, 476-1075
L.HIS-341: The Age of Love & Reason: Medieval Europe, 1075-1530
L.HIS-342: The Reformation-AI
L.HIS-343: Medieval Christianity
L.HIS-346: Isle of the Saints: A Study Tour-AI
L.HIS 348: Paris in the 1920’s & 1930’s.
 
GENERAL HISTORY
L.HIS-288: Historical Methods
L.HIS-333: Imperial Geographies-AA
L.HIS-395: Topics
L.HIS-489: Seminar for Majors: Interpretations
L.HIS-490: Research Seminar
L.HIS-494: Internship in History
 
JANUARY TERM
L.HIS-227: The March for Life
L.HIS-232: Herbert Hoover & the Great Depression
L.HIS-240: Greek Odyssey-AC
L.HIS-246: Chicago’s Art & Architecture-AA
L.HIS-278: Chinese Cities in the Past & Present
L.HIS-285: The Arab-Israeli Conflict
L.HIS-344: Celtic Christianity & Roman Catholicism
L.HIS-365: Contemporary Urban Portugal
L.HIS-385: Peace & Justice in Israel & Palestine
 
LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY
L.HIS-155: Introduction to Latin American History
L.HIS-255: United States/Latin American Relations
L.HIS-257: Modern Brazilian History & Culture-AC
 
UNITED STATES HISTORY
L.HIS-121: United States To 1877
L.HIS-122: United States Since 1865
L.HIS-225: Confederates: Virtual & Real-AI
L.HIS-226: Catholi-schism Controversy-AI
L.HIS-229: African American History-AI
L.HIS-230: Community & Identity in the American West-AI
L.HIS-231: History of U.S. Sexuality-AV
L.HIS-235: Race & Gender Reform in the United States-AC
L.HIS-239: United States Women’s History-AC
L.HIS-386: United States Survey for Teachers
L.HIS-427: United States Catholicism
L.HIS-431: Revolutionary Era in the United States
L.HIS-439: The Creation of Modern America, 1877-1924
L.HIS-443: Civil War & Reconstruction
L.HIS-449: Populists, Progressives & the Labor Movement, 1870-1919
L.HIS-453: The Great Depression & the New Deal
L.HIS-455: United States History Since 1945
L.HIS-456: The Civil Rights Movement
L.HIS-472: The United States & Vietnam

Course Descriptions
L.HIS-116: Ancient Greek Civilization
A survey of ancient Greek history and culture from the Bronze Age of heroes of the Trojan War through the Hellenistic period ushered in by Alexander the Great. The course will try to answer the questions “who were the ancient Greeks and why are they worth studying today?” by examining the history, art, and literature they produced. 3 credits.L.HIS-117: Roman Civilization
A survey of Roman history and culture from the mysterious Etruscan period and the legendary founding of Rome through the fall of the western half of the Empire. The course will try to answer the questions “who were the Romans and why are they worth studying today?” by examining the history, art, and literature they produced. 3 credits.L.HIS-121: United States To 1877
The founding, expansion, and development of the United States from discovery and colonization to the Reconstruction era. 3 credits.

L.HIS-122: United States Since 1865
United States history from the end of the Civil War to the present. 3 credits. Each spring semester.

L.HIS-140: Europe To 1750
A study of the political, cultural and intellectual developments of Europe to 1750. 3 credits.

L.HIS-141: Modern Europe Since 1750
A study of the political, cultural, and intellectual development of Europe. 3 credits.

L.HIS-155: Introduction to Latin American History
A one-semester introductory survey of Latin American history from pre-Columbian civilizations to the present. 3 credits.

L.HIS-161: Modern Africa since 1800
A survey of sub-Saharan Africa during the age of European exploration, conquest, and colonization. Topics include the revolutions in West and Southern Africa; abolition of the slave trade; European exploration and trade; military conquest and African resistance; white settlers in Africa; British, French, and German colonial rule; the economics of western colonialism; the emergence of African elites and the growth of African nationalism. 3 credits.

L.HIS-175: Themes in World History
Instead of striving for a comprehensive coverage of world history, this course focuses on a few selected themes, such as migration, gender, warfare, and revolutions. Each theme will be examined in global and comparative perspectives. The emphasis of the course is placed on the modern world, but pre-modern influences and patterns will also be explored in some of the themes. 3 credits.

L.HIS-220: Introduction to Archaeology & Cultural Heritage Interpretation
Students will learn how archaeology has changed over time, from pot-hunting and treasure-seeking by individuals, to a sophisticated science incorporating many different sub-disciplines. Students will also learn the basic methods and procedures involved in actually “doing” archaeology, as well as tangle with some of the ethical issues involved. We will also study how archaeologists go about interpreting their finds to the general public. 3 credits.

L.HIS-225: Confederates: Virtual & Real-AI
The Confederate States of America ceased its “real” life with Lee’s surrender in 1865. But ever since then it has taken on a “virtual” existence of regional consciousness, neo-confederate ideology, agrarianism and anti-governmental centralization. By means of primary sources, material and popular cultural artifacts, films and literature, the course will focus on questions of identity and community raised by its “virtual” existence. Prerequisites: LIB100, LIB 105, LIB 110 and one course from LIB 130, LIB 135, or LIB 220.

L.HIS-226: Catholi-schism Controversy-AI
An (AI) Identity and Community offering that explores issues that are controversial or over which US Catholics are in fundamental disagreement. Issues will be approached from the perspective of Catholic individuals’ and groups’ self-identity and sub-group identity. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-227: The March for Life
This course will be a Study Travel Course. The study-travel component will center in preparing for, actually participating in the March For Life and reflectively processing the participation experience. It will also involve participating in and processing a visit to Network: A National Catholic Social Justice Lobby. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-229: African American History-AI
This course studies the African American experience from slavery to the present focusing on the formation of both personal and community identities in light of the experience of slavery and racism. Key to our exploration of African American identity will be resistance and reform. The course will also place a heavy emphasis on African American musical traditions. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-220, L.LIB-130, or L.LIB-135. 3 credits.

L.HIS-230: Community & Identity in the American West-AI
This course focuses primarily on the interaction of Native Americans, Hispanics and the diverse population of immigrants (Euro-American, African-American, Chinese and European) who settled in United States territories west of the Mississippi River during the nineteenth century. Through primary source texts, objects, artwork and music, students will explore individual identity and how a group of individuals uses culture to build community. We will study how the interactions within a shared culture transform personal identities as well as how interactions across cultures shape each community. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-231: History of U.S. Sexuality-AV
The contemporary dialogue over sexual values and conflicts regarding sexual-decision making are not new to the American experience. In fact, scholars organize the history of American sexuality around “contested moments” in the debate over sexual ethics and behaviors. From the initial settlement of Europeans in the New World and their contact with the worldview of Native Americans to the more recent “sexual revolutions” of the modern era, Americans debated sex. The predominant ethical framework governing that conversation reflects the dominance of Protestant Christianity in American culture. Other ideological frameworks deriving from science, gender construction, economic patterns, racism and generational conflict also drive the evolution of sexual value sets. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-220, L.LIB-130, or L.LIB-135. 3 credits.

L.HIS-232: Herbert Hoover & the Great Depression
When elected in 1928, people perceived Herbert Hoover as a caring, compassionate, humanitarian. By 1932, American citizens believed he did not care about the people—some blamed him for the depression and to others his name became synonymous with Satan. Why did this transformation in public opinion happen? This J-term course will explore this question by studying the effects of the Great Depression on the American populace and their response. It also examines the character and actions of Herbert Hoover both before and during his presidency. Key to our study will be the archival collections of the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library & Museum in West Branch, Iowa. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-235: Race & Gender Reform in the United States-AC
The course focuses on the struggles for racial and gender equality that took place in the United U.S. during the 19th and 20th centuries. During the 19th century the struggle to eradicate slavery–the abolition movement–contributed to the evolution of a women’s rights movement; more recently, the civil rights movement helped to stimulate the women’s liberation movement. This course compares and contrasts these movements for racial and gender justice. We will study the past, but also bring our historical query to the present with a study of contemporary social movements. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-236: Art & Archaeology of Greece & Rome
A study of the sites and artifacts of ancient Greek and Roman material culture. Includes an introduction to archaeological theory and methods, and an examination of the physical remains, as well as an interpretation of those artifacts to help reconstruct the ancient lifeways of these prolific cultures. 3 credits. Dependent on staff and demand.

L.HIS-239: United States Women’s History-AC
This course focuses on the evolving concept of gender identity in American society. We will compare and contrast the experiences of women of varying ethnic, class, racial, and regional identities. Women labored at home and for wages. They built and influenced families, communities and organizations. They worked to reform society, shaping the social, political and economic world through their efforts. We will trace the evolution of women’s rights and gender equity from the early 1600s to the present. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-240: Greek Odyssey-AC
This course is an overseas study course. The students will investigate how the physical remains of an ancient culture, studied over different time periods, reveal changes in the culture’s social structure, political institutions, economic forces, technological advancements, etc. Although the focus of the study trip will be to examine physical sites and artifacts, wherever possible students will read primary literary sources that offer insights from the ancient Greeks themselves into their own culture. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-245: The Celts-AC
The Celts- Hags, Druids, and Saints pace the pages of Celtic myth and folklore, entrancing audiences and readers with stories of personal dilemmas, heroism, and magic. This course will analyze comparatively some Irish and Welsh myths, study the evolution of the legend of St. Patrick, and read fairy tales in an effort to understand important cultural realities and the social changes they reflect. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-246: Chicago’s Art & Architecture-AA
The course will begin on the Loras campus with an examination of classical forms of both art and architecture from ancient Greece and Rome. Students will create timelines, outlines, and files of visual images and consider their own surroundings, first on a practice run in Dubuque and then in Chicago, to make connections between the ancient and modern worlds of art and architecture and adding to their visual files. Students will return to Loras to create a Tour of Chicago that features items and locales that reflect classical clues in Chicago’s Art and Architecture. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-248: Identity, Community, and the Cold War-AI
This course examines the history of the Cold War with special emphasis placed on the American and Soviet visions of the world community and Soviet and American identities underlying the conflict between these two superpowers.  The course will also briefly look at the relations between the U. S. and post-Soviet Russia and the new Russian national identity developed after the Cold War. 3 credits.

L.HIS-249: Russian Civilization-AC
A study of Russian history with a special emphasis on the cultural context. The course starts with a brief overview of pre-Petrine Russia, but places the emphasis on imperial Russia (from Peter the Great to 1917) and Soviet and post-Soviet Russia. Students are expected to develop an in-depth understanding of continuity and change in Russian civilization and of the differences and similarities between Russian civilization and Western civilization. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-255: United States/Latin American Relations
A survey of Interamerican relations with emphasis on the period from the Spanish-American War (1898) to the present and on U.S. relations with Latin America. 3 credits.

L.HIS-257: Modern Brazilian History & Culture-AC
This course examines the history of Latin America’s largest geographic and most populous nation from the arrival of the Portuguese Court in 1808 to present. Focus will be on issues such as the dynamics and legacies of the world’s largest slave society, economic growth and industrialization, political organization and participation, liberalism, populism, authoritarianism and democracy, urbanization, race relations, European and Asian immigration to Brazil, ethnic and gender identities, regionalism, and elements of popular culture such as music, the arts, and sports. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-272: Japan in the Modern World–AI
This course is a study of modern Japanese history since the Meiji Restoration (1868), emphasizing: (1) Japan’s Westernization and contesting views of the national identity after the Meiji Restoration; (2) the Japanese view of themselves and other nations during World War II and the contesting national identities of the Japanese as victims or victimizers in the postwar discourse on war experience and responsibility; (3) the transformation of group identities brought about by economic development and social changes in Japan since 1945. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-275: History As Film: East Asia
This course examines themes in East Asian history dramatized in select feature films. Films to be viewed and critiqued in class include Genghis Khan: To the Ends of the Eath and Sea and The Last Samurai. A feature film on a historical theme is a piece of art, but it interprets history. While it is not a source of historical knowledge, its interpretation of history can and should be evaluated or critiqued; such evaluations or critiques would help us develop a more sophisticated understanding of the past. Prerequisite: L.LIB-100. 3 credits.

L.HIS-277: Modern Chinese History & Culture-AC
A study of China from the Opium War (1839-1842) to the present, with an emphasis on cultural history. This course examines how political, economic, and cultural changes during the last one and half centuries have altered the sense the Chinese have of themselves and of China’s place in the world. It also examines how cultural tradition persists in China through changes. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100; L.LIB-105; L.LIB-110; and one from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-278: Chinese Cities in the Past & Present
This study travel course explores China’s urban history and far-reaching changes taking place in Chinese cities. Students travel to Beijing, the imperial capital during the last three dynasties and the capital of today’s People’s Republic of China; Shanghai, the largest city in China; Suzhou, a historical city that Marco Polo compared to Venice. Themes to be studied include (1) the development of cities and their political and economic roles in imperial China, (2) physical and spatial features of and the social and cultural contexts that created these features, (3) traditional Chinese gardens and the underlying philosophical and aesthetic views, (4) China’s current accelerated urbanization and urban planning, and (5) the social and cultural transformation of Chinese cities. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-282: History as Film: Africa-AC
This course explores three cultural traditions–American, European, African–as represented in their dramatic/action films on African history, and helps develop an awareness of fundamental differences between western (American/European) and African perceptions of Africa, as long-standing western/African cultural traditions. The course will address issues of change and continuity in American and European cultural imaging of Africa; African critiques of American and European historical films; African stereotypes as reflections of evolving American and European race consciousness. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-285: The Arab-Israeli Conflict
The Arab-Israeli Conflict is an interactive course that will educate students about the complexities of the relationship between Israel, Palestinians, and their Middle Eastern neighbors and will engage students interactively with sources and people through reading, role play, and personal contact with people who are impacted by the situation, and institutional peace efforts, grass-roots action toward reconciliation, and voices of dissent in both Palestinian and Jewish communities. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-288: Historical Methods
An introductory course for history majors or potential majors that deals with historical methodologies by means of primary and secondary source materials drawn from US history. Much attention will be given to identifying, constructing, reconstructing and critiquing historical interpretations. Students must earn a grade of C or better for the major. 3 credits.

L.HIS-306: Historians of Greece & Rome
Readings from the classical historians. Emphasis is placed upon the development of history as a literary genre and an intellectual endeavor. Greek authors: Herodotus, Thucydides, Polybius, Plutarch. Roman authors: Caesar, Sallust, Livy, Tacitus, Suetonius. 3 credits.

L.HIS-320: Archaeology of the Upper Mississippi Valley
Designed to prepare students for archeology and cultural interpretation heritage work in the Upper Mississippi Valley, this course will provide both an overview of the ancient history of the continental United States as well as a detailed examination of the archeology of the Upper Mississippi River Valley. This will be an extensive study of the evolution of peoples in the Mississippi River Valley from the Clovis—12 to 15,000 years ago—to the indigenous peoples in the area at contact with Europeans in the 1600s. 3 credits.

L.HIS-329: The Enlightenment
An examination of the major institutions of eighteenth-century European society and the social history of ideas, particularly the contrast between elite and popular culture, and the primary social criticisms and reforms proposed by Enlightenment writers, such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau, and the Encyclopedists. Open to seniors and juniors, sophomores with approval. 3 credits.

L.HIS-330: The French Revolution
The causes and course of the revolution including the origins of modern political culture in the Enlightenment and the revolution, international repercussions, terror, social consequences, and the Napoleonic period. Open to seniors and juniors, sophomores with approval. 3 credits.

L.HIS-333: Imperial Geographies-AA
This course will study how the aesthetics of urban design and architecture from the late 19th century to present are symbolic of key questions that speak to imperialism, colonialism, nationalism, and the postcolonial condition. The course material will consider how architects, geographers, urban planners, and certain political and social classes engaged the legacy of colonialism and the politics of nationalism in their work and practices. Attention will be paid to the spatial organization of colonial and postcolonial cities, the politics of architectural and urban design, and the aesthetic nature of urban iconography. Case studies will be drawn from various cities throughout Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Caribbean. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-340: The Age of Kings & Conversions: Medieval Europe, 476-1075
An exploration of the vivacious and complex world of barbarians and monks, pagans and Christians, queens and bishops. Questions about historical interpretation and analysis of evidence are important to the study and understanding of this period. Open to seniors and juniors, sophomores with approval. 3 credits.

L.HIS-341: The Age of Love & Reason: Medieval Europe, 1075-1530
A thematic study of the late medieval period that addresses issues of importance for that age and of interest for the modern world. Important themes will include love and marriage, chivalry, heresy, architecture and representation, individual and communal identity, the formation of nation-states, the Crusades, popular culture, intellectual developments, and the Italian Renaissance. Open to seniors and juniors, sophomores with approval. 3 credits.

L.HIS-342: The Reformation-AI
The Reformation was by all accounts a spectacular event. Framed by the bitter denunciations of Martin Luther and the rigid restrictions of the Index of Forbidden books, enlivened by theological debate and mortified by extreme violence, the Reformation was to the people of the sixteenth century inspiring yet harsh and provided absolute certainty while at the same time provoking unimaginable confusion and complexity. How did it respond to the question, “What does it mean to be a Christian”. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220.3 credits.

L.HIS-343: Medieval Christianity
A study of the development of western Christianity in the Middle Ages, with particular attention to formative influences, definitive tensions, diverse perceptions and popular appeal. The most important themes are monasticism, sanctity, heresy, and the spiritual expressions of women and men. Less emphasis upon institutional history. Open to seniors and juniors, sophomores with approval. 3 credits.

L.HIS-344: Celtic Christianity & Roman Catholicism
This is a study travel course to England, Ireland, and Scotland, exploring historical places associated with the earliest Christians in those areas. Focusing especially on the collaboration and conflict between the Celtic Christianity of Ireland, Wales, and Scotland and the Roman Christianity spreading from the south of England, the course will examine the transition from paganism to Christianity and the conceptual realities that made that both possible and challenging. Destinations may vary each time the course is taught. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-346: Isle of the Saints: A Study Tour-AI
Through travel and study in Ireland, this course examines medieval Irish society, including law, genealogy, and tribal affiliation, from the beginnings of Irish “history” in the fourth century A.D. to the religious and political turmoil of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, when Continental calls for Reformation joined with Tudor and Cromwellian assertions of power to force Irish people to reorganize their communities and their sense of identity. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100; L.LIB-105; L.LIB-110; and one from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS 348: Paris in the 1920’s & 1930’s
Paris in the 20s was the place to be. There you could find a fusion of the latest, most daring trends in art, music and literature and a haven for those who had no “home” to speak of- displaced Russian nobility who had fled their homeland after the Revolution; Africans from various French colonies who had come to Paris to study; American Blacks who had come to escape repressive Jim Crow laws. We will examine this period through art, music, literature, journalism. 3 credits.

L.HIS-349: The Second World War
The causes of the war, the European and Pacific campaigns, the civilian reaction, the Holocaust, resistance movements and the origins of the Cold War. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.HIS-360: Southern Africa Since 1800
An examination of the impact of white settler rule in the region of Southern Africa, which includes countries of Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Topics include settler colonialism; the imperial scramble for colonies; British and Portuguese colonial rule; the regional mine labor system; Apartheid, and African struggles for independence. Restriction: not open to first-year students. 3 credits.

L.HIS-365: Contemporary Urban Portugal
The main content of the course will investigate the various historical and geographical issues surrounding the fall and legacies of the Portuguese empire in Africa such as national identity and geopolitics, migration, and subsequent changes to the cultural landscape and human geography of the metropolitan Lisbon area. Students will have the opportunity to study these themes firsthand by visiting many of Lisbon’s historic and newly constructed neighborhoods, museums, monuments, and community centers that speak to these dynamic issues. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-380: The Cold War
A study of the Cold War as a global confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union and as a global conflict between Communism and capitalism. Topics include the origins of the Cold War, nuclear weapons and the Cold War, ideologies of the Cold War and propaganda, the Third World and the Cold War, and the end of the Cold War. Open to seniors and juniors, sophomores with approval. 3 credits.

L.HIS-385: Peace & Justice in Israel & Palestine
This course is a travel learning experience in which students will develop an understanding of the sources of conflict between Israelis and Palestinians, interact with people of various religious traditions and cultural heritages who are directly affected by the adversity in the region, and reflect on various efforts to resolve tensions there. The course will travel to locations in Israel and Palestine. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-386: United States Survey for Teachers
Designed to prepare K-12 teachers of social studies and United States history, this course develops the ability to conceptualize and define the American past in order to teach United States history, this course provides models and tools for determining the overarching themes that help explain and explore the American past using a wide variety of methods. Students will identify resources that help teachers make decisions on what to teach, define historical trends, and analyze reading strategies in the field of history including reading comprehension and critical reading. Required for the endorsement in American History and the All Social Sciences Teaching endorsement. Restricted to Teacher Education students only. 3 credits.

L.HIS-392: History as Film
This course examines the uses of film as sources of historical knowledge, principally through documentaries but also through semi-documentaries and fictional films. Non-traditional materials of historians (motion-picture films) as well as traditional materials (written sources) will enhance significantly the student’s interest in and understanding of modern history. Topics vary and will be determined by the availability of films and students’ interest. 3 credits.

L.HIS-395: Topics
History topics course. Used to develop courses which have not been approved under another catalog number. See Division Chair for more information.

L.HIS-404: Historical Geography
An historical overview of the major developments in formal, practical, and popular global geopolitics from the late 19thcentury to present. The material will examine the origins, application, and outcomes of geopolitical theories related to cartography; empire and imperialism; nation building and nationalism; decolonization and independence; the Cold War; and the multi-faceted dimensions of globalization. This course will partially satisfy the geography requirement for the All-Social Science teaching endorsement. Sophomores and above. 3 credits.

L.HIS-427: United States Catholicism
The history of Roman Catholics and Roman Catholicism in the U.S. from colonial beginnings to the present with special emphasis on the changes in and anomalies of Catholic identity. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.HIS-431: Revolutionary Era in the United States
The U.S. in the 18th century, development of British imperial policy and reactions to it, the break from the British empire, experiments in new forms of self-government and the framing, ratification and implementation of the U.S. Constitution in the 1790’s. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.HIS-439: The Creation of Modern America, 1877-1924
This course concentrates on the incredible transformation of society that took place in the United States between 1877 and 1924. The changes of this period resulted in the creation of modern American society. To understand the 20th century we must understand the changes begun during the Gilded Age and completed by the 1920’s. Because these changes took place in almost every area of society, this course will draw upon social, cultural, economic, diplomatic, and political history. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.HIS-443: Civil War & Reconstruction
The U.S. from the 1840’s through the 1870’s with emphasis on the causes of the war, military operations of the conflict and its impact on the U.S., the difficulties of reconciling the former enemies. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.HIS-449: Populists, Progressives & the Labor Movement, 1870-1919
Many people protested the incredible transformation of their lives that occurred in the U.S. during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This course concentrates on the problems created by the changes of the Gilded Age and how people coped with them. To improve their lives and to impose order on a chaotic world, farmers, laborers and middle-class progressives demanded reform through populism, labor unions and the progressive movement. Open to seniors and juniors, sophomores with approval. L.HIS-439 recommended, but not required. 3 credits.

L.HIS-453: The Great Depression & the New Deal
A study of the Great Depression in the United States, including its origins, the consequences of depression on U.S. society and the New Deal as a response to the crisis. Different perspectives based on race, gender, age and region will be discussed. This course will also examine the legacy of the New Deal, including the evolution of the social welfare state, the transformation of the role of government in society and the expansion of the power of the president. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.HIS-455: United States History Since 1945
The political, social, and economic history of the U.S. from the end of World War II to the present including the evolution of Cold War politics and major changes in U.S. society. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.HIS-456: The Civil Rights Movement
A focus on organizations, and to a lesser degree on their leaders, involved in the post-World War II struggle for racial equality in southern and northern states. Organizations studied include the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, Congress of Racial Equality, the Black Panthers, the Nation of Islam, and a sample of local action groups. 3 credits.

L.HIS-472: The United States & Vietnam
A history of the Vietnam wars and their impact on both Vietnam and the United States. The course will highlight the historical development of Vietnamese society, French colonialism, the Cold War politics of F.D.R. through Nixon, the military history of U.S involvement, and the turmoil on the U.S. home front. Open to seniors and juniors, sophomores with approval. 3 credits.

L.HIS-489: Seminar for Majors: Interpretations
This seminar presents a critical examination of the major events and issues in European history, historians’ interpretations of these events and issues, and problems of historical research and methodology. The focus is Eurocentric. The scope is global. Open only to senior or junior history majors, normally in their second semester junior year. Students must earn a grade of C or better for the major. 3 credits.

L.HIS-490: Research Seminar
Emphasis in this course is on research and the production of quality papers based on primary and secondary materials. For history majors only, normally in their senior year. Cannot be repeated more than once. Students must earn a grade of C or better for the major. 3 credits.

L.HIS-494: Internship in History
This internship will provide students with a learning experience while working several hours a week for a semester or during the summer for a historical society, history firm, museum, archive, research library, or some equivalent institution. Prerequisites: senior or junior standing, completion of 12 credits in history prior to the beginning of the internship, and permission of the division chair and the work supervisor of the internship at the institution where the internship will be performed. 2-3 credits (a minimum of 50 hours of work required per credit).

RELATED COURSES: Economics, International Studies, Politics, Sociology

Career Opportunities

After receiving your degree from Loras, your career could take off into one of these fields:

• High School Teacher
• Business Management
• Public Relations Specialist
• Librarian
• Police Officer
• Ministry/Priesthood
• Accountant
• Museum and archives

Loras College Department Staff

Kristin Anderson-Bricker, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
563-588-7403 | Kristin.Anderson-Bricker@loras.edu
Curriculum Vitae

Kristin Anderson-Bricker completed a doctorate at Syracuse University in United States social and cultural history with specialties in race, gender and social movements. Upon graduation in 1997, she accepted a position at Loras College in Dubuque, Iowa. Anderson-Bricker teaches topical courses covering American history from the late nineteenth century through to the present. She also teaches on the American West, Native Americans in the Upper Mississippi River Valley, Women’s History, sexuality, African Americans and historical methods (research and teaching).

She is currently at work on a book manuscript, Going Beyond the Rules: Catholic Young Adults Making Sexual Decisions, designed to initiate between students a conversation about sex to assist them in determining the values they want to apply to their choices about sex.

Her service work has focused on diversity initiatives including committee chair responsibilities, gender equity and a civil discourse initiative (DuTalk). Anderson-Bricker has directed the Honors Program and served on many committees including Rank and Tenure, Faculty Senate and First Year Experience. In addition to serving on the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library Association’s travel grant committee and assessing manuscripts for the State Historical Society of Iowa, she has served the profession as a program reviewer for the National Endowment for the Humanities, Humanities Iowa, Dubuque County Historical Society and Effigy Mounds National Monument.

Richard Anderson, Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology
563-588-7177 | Richard.Anderson@loras.edu

Christopher Budzisz, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Politics
Division Chair of Philosophical, Theological, Social, & Cultural Studies
563-588-7279 | Christopher.Budzisz@loras.edu

Professor Budzisz joined the Loras College Politics program in 2000, with a teaching emphasis on constitutional law, American government and institutions and political philosophy, as well as elections and political behavior. As a 2007 Fulbright Scholar, Budzisz taught in the International Relations Faculty at Chernivtsi National University in Chernivtsi, Ukraine. His research interests center around constitutional law, political thought and public policy. He has been published in PS: Political Science and Politics, and in the edited volume Engaging the Public: How Government and the Media Can Reinvigorate American Democracy.

Beyond his teaching and research interests, Budzisz is director and coach of the Loras College Moot Court program. He is also a past winner of the Mike and Linda Budde Excellence in Teaching Award. Professor Budzisz serves as the Director of the Loras College Poll, a bi-partisan public opinion survey focused on politics and society that was launched spring 2014

Roman Ciapalo, Ph.D.
Professor of Philosophy
563-588-7434 | Roman.Ciapalo@loras.edu

Roman T. Ciapalo, Ph.D. (Loyola University Chicago) has taught at Loras College since 1982. He has offered a variety of courses, including Ancient Philosophy, Contemporary Philosophy, and Philosophy of the Human Person, but in recent years has concentrated on teaching a variety of applied ethics courses, among them, Business Ethics, Environmental Ethics, Media Communication Ethics, and Ethics in Sports.

His research interests include the philosophy of Gregory Skovoroda (18thcentury Ukrainian philosopher) and the intersection of Catholic Social Teaching with issues in sports and athletics. He has published one book and several articles, and has served as translator/editor of Ukrainian-language translations of two business ethics textbooks. He also serves as Faculty Advisor to the Loras Hockey Club, Loras Philosophy Club, and Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity. He has lectured nationally and internationally in New Delhi, India, Bratislava, Slovak Republic, and Lviv and Kiev, Ukraine. He has been the recipient of a Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminar to Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia and was a Fulbright Scholar at Lviv State University in Ukraine during the 1993-94 academic year.

He travels to Ukraine each summer to teach business ethics courses for various MBA Programs, including the Lviv Institute of Management and Kiev-Mohyla University, and has conducted workshops on “Ethics in the Public Sector” for the city management teams of Dubuque, Cedar Rapids, and Lviv, Ukraine. During the past two summers, he has lectured at the annual two-week long “Philosophy Summer School” conducted by Ukrainian Catholic University in Lviv, Ukraine.

He urges his Philosophy advisees to see philosophy as a way of life, rather than merely an academic discipline to be mastered, and to employ it in their search for meaning and purpose in their lives. Beginning with the 2014-2015 academic year, he will hold the Andrew P. Studdert Endowed Chair in Business Ethics and Crisis Leadership.

David Cochran, Ph.D.
Professor of Politics
Director of the Archbishop Kucera Center
563-588-7262 | David.Cochran@loras.edu
Curriculum Vitae

Originally from Lubbock, Texas, Dr. Cochran received his B.A. from Drew University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Maryland. He has taught in the Politics Program since 1996, offering a range of courses primarily in the areas of political thought and American politics. He also teaches General Education courses such as War and Pacifism and The Irish in America. Cochran is a winner of the college’s Budde Teaching Excellence Award. His primary research interests are in religion and politics, multiculturalism and democracy and the morality of war, frequently publishing, lecturing and leading workshops on these and other topics. In addition to a wide array of articles and book chapters, Cochran is the author of a book on race and political theory and the co-author of two books on Catholicism and American politics, and recently published his latest book on war and morality. In addition to his work in the Politics Program, Cochran also directs the college’s Archbishop Kucera Center for Catholic Studies.

Benjamin Darr, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Politics
563-588-7507 | Benjamin.Darr@loras.edu

Dr. Darr began teaching at Loras College in the fall of 2012, and offers courses in both comparative politics and world politics. He is particularly interested in environmental politics, the politics of the global economy, nationalism and China studies. Dr. Darr received his Ph.D. from the University of Iowa in 2011, and his dissertation examined the state-led sources of Chinese nationalism and national identity. He has co-authored articles in the Journal of Contemporary China and in Communist and Post-Communist Studies.

John Eby, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
Chairperson for Faculty Senate
563-588-4929 | John.Eby@loras.edu

Lisa Garoutte, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology
563-588-7022 | Lisa.Garoutte@loras.edu

Janine Idziak, Ph.D.
Professor of Philosophy
Director of Bioethics Center
563-588-7749 | Janine.Idziak@loras.edu

Dr. Idziak’s areas of interest include ethics, medieval philosophy, and the philosophy of God and religion. She received A.B., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in philosophy from the University of Michigan and subsequently earned a M.A. in theology from the University of Notre Dame. Her courses of instruction include Foundational Ethics, The Theory and Practice of Bioethics, Ethics and the New Genetics, Neuroethics, Ethics in Philosophy, Literature and Film, the Philosophy of God and Religion, Medieval Philosophy, and The Catholic Heritage.

Dr. Idziak’s research work in ethical theory has focused on the history of divine command ethics. She has held postdoctoral research appointments at the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies (PIMS) in Toronto and at the Medieval Institute of the University of Notre Dame. Her research has been funded by grants from PIMS, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Council of Learned Societies. She is the editor of Divine Command Morality: Historical and Contemporary Readings, and has published a Latin edition and English translation of the most significant medieval text on this ethical theory, Andrew of Neufchateau, O.F.M., Questions on an Ethics of Divine Commands.

In the area of applied ethics, Dr. Idziak’s work focuses on bioethics. She is founding director of Loras’ Bioethics Center, which provides services to the community locally and within the State of Iowa. She currently serves as Health Care Ethics Consultant and chair of the Medical-Moral Commission for the Archdiocese of Dubuque; as chair of the ethics committee at Stonehill Franciscan Services in Dubuque; and as a member of the Institutional Ethics Committee, the Clinical Ethics Committee, and the IRB at Mercy Medical Center in Dubuque. Within the State of Iowa, she serves on the Board and IRB of the John Paul II Medical Research Institute in Iowa City and on the Data and Safety Monitoring Committee for NewLink Genetics in Ames. She previously served on the Pandemic Ethics Committee of the Iowa Department of Public Health and, at the national level, on the Ethics Commission and in the House of Delegates of the American Association of Homes and Services for the Aging (AAHSA). Dr. Idziak’s community work in bioethics has led to the publication of three books: Ethical Dilemmas in Allied Health, Ethical Dilemmas in Long Term Care, and Organizational Ethics in Senior Health Care Services. Her community service has been recognized by a national level Trustee of the Year award from AAHSA.

Rev. William Joensen, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Philosophy
Dean of Campus Spiritual Life
563-588-7463 | William.Joensen@loras.edu

Fr. Joensen teaches courses in the history of philosophy (Ancient and Modern), philosophy of being (metaphysics), philosophy of knowledge (epistemology), philosophy of the human person and courses in our Catholic Identity mission course category.

As academic advisor to Philosophy majors, Fr. Joensen tries to help students see how their awakening intellectual passions and life and work experiences might be indications of worthy professional pursuits. He also strives to help them appreciate how habits of mind, such as analytical thinking and critical reflection, and the ability to communicate ideas lucidly in written and spoken form will serve them all their lives.

As Dean of Campus Spiritual Life, he promotes the Catholic mission and identity of the College through the Faith and Values Education Committee and other avenues, including student-development programming. He is also chaplain to the Daughters of Isabella group of Catholic Loras Duhawk women, and offers individual spiritual direction to students and others.

Each summer, Fr. Joensen participates as a faculty member at the Tertio Milllennio Seminar in Krakow, Poland, which brings together European and American young adults to study Catholic social and moral teaching in the spirit of Blessed Pope John Paul II. He is also a regular contributor of scriptural and seasonal reflections to Magnificat®, a Catholic spiritual resource.

Mark Kehren, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
563-588-7633 | Mark.Kehren@loras.edu

Jacob Kohlhaas, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Moral Theology
563-588-7308 | Jacob.Kohlhaas@loras.edu

Dr. Kohlhaas received his Ph.D. in Theology from Duquesne University where his dissertation considered contemporary Catholic theological accounts of parenthood and the nature of kinship within the Christian tradition. He received his M.A. in Doctrine, with a minor in History, at Catholic Theological Union where his thesis compared and contrasted developments in Catholic and Lutheran perspectives on human sexuality since the mid-twentieth century. Dr. Kohlhaas teaches courses on Christian morality and the Catholic moral tradition including Introduction to Christian Values, Issues in Christian Ethics, Christian Sexual Morality and Catholic Social Teaching as well as Introduction to Theology and Religious Studies and Social Justice Today. Dr. Kohlhaas’ research centers on questions of Theological Anthropology, particularly the moral aspects of the human need and capacity for relationships. This has led to specific research in the areas of sexual ethics, family ethics, environmental ethics, and theologies of children and parenthood.

Christoffer Lammer-Heindel, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Philosophy
563-588-7733 | Christoffer.Lammer-Heindel@loras.edu

Within the Philosophy Program, Dr. Lammer-Heindel teaches Critical Reasoning, Introduction to Philosophy, Contemporary Philosophy, and the Philosophy of Science. He also teaches Democracy and Global Diversity and Catholicism and Taoism, both of which are general education courses. His academic expertise includes analytic ethics and contemporary social and political philosophy. His research interests pertain to issues surrounding the nature of moral duties and obligations, especially institutionally or collectively held moral duties and obligations, as well as sustainability ethics. He is the author of the critical reasoning handbook, which is used in the Modes of Inquiry course.

Amy Lorenz, Ph.D.
Professor of Multicultural Languages
563-588-7806 | Amy.Lorenz@loras.edu

For many years, Amy Lorenz was Loras’ French Professor. When that program ended, the History and Religious Studies programs kindly “adopted” her. She now teaches courses on French literature in translation, the Renaissance and Reformation in Europe, the Enlightenment, Paris in the 20s and 30s, Introduction to the Bible, and a seminar on the letters of Paul. She also enjoys teaching regularly in the general education program, especially in the clusters and the LIB 130 cohort.

Her current research stems from her more recent formal training in theology and focuses on Second Temple Judaism; Jesus, Paul and Judaism; the Roman Empire and early followers of Jesus; and scripture.

She has had the privilege of working with 2 January term groups of students in France and Italy and has enjoyed those travels immensely. She lived in France between her B.A. and M.A. degrees, working in the school system there, and returned there to spend several more months during her Ph.D. studies. She returns as often as she is able to stay with friends.

Amanda Osheim, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Practical Theology
Director of Breitbach Catholic Thinkers and Leaders Program
563-588-7506 | Amanda.Osheim@loras.edu

Dr. Osheim received her doctorate in systematic theology from Boston College. Her courses include Introduction to Religious Studies and Theology; Foundations for Ministry; God’s Literature; Empowered Catholic Women, The Four Marks, and Communication for Communion. Dr. Osheim’s particular interest is ecclesiology, which is the study of the church’s identity and mission. She also collaborates with the Archdiocese of Dubuque to develop programs that meet the growing need for lay leadership in parishes.

Her research focuses on discernment of the Holy Spirit within the church; development of church doctrine and practice; and the evolving role of lay ministers in the church’s life. Dr. Osheim is an editor and contributor at DailyTheology.org. Other recent publications include: “On Our Pilgrim Way [Responses to ‘Evangelii Gaudium’].” America: The National Catholic Review vol.210 no. 1 (January 6-13, 2014) http://americamagazine.org/issue/joy-world; “Theology: serving the conversation.” C21 Resources, Fall 2013, p. 37. http://issuu.com/church21c/docs/2013_fall_resource_guide_final_web_; “The Local Church in Dialogue: Toward an Orthopraxis of Reception.” In Visions of Hope: Emerging Theologians and the Future of the Church. Kevin J. Ahern, ed. Orbis Books, 2012.

Kathrin Parks, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology
563-588-7819 | Kathrin.Parks@loras.edu

David Pitt, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Theology
563-588-7324 | David.Pitt@loras.edu

Dr. Pitt is trained as a liturgical historian and as a liturgical musician. His Ph.D. in Theology (Liturgical Studies) is from the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, where he researched the reform of the rite for adult initiation in the Roman Catholic Church following the Second Vatican Council. His M.A. in Liturgical Music (Organ Performance and Composition) is from St. John’s University, Minnesota. These academic interests guide his teaching and his research, motivating him to investigate areas in which the Tradition of the Church might inform and direct contemporary pastoral practice. He co-edited A Living Tradition: Essays on the Intersection of Liturgical History and Pastoral Practice (Liturgical Press, 2012). Author of over 45 essays, article, and book reviews, he has especially focused on the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA), the liturgical year, issues in the performance of liturgical music, and the music of Olivier Messiaen. Pitt held the 2013-2014 John Cardinal O’Connor Chair for Catholic Thought, during which time he was researching the history of Eucharistic praying. Pitt is actively involved in liturgical music ministry, currently serving as Organist at St. John’s Episcopal Church. He has led pastoral workshops and given organ concerts and recitals across the United States and in Canada.

Cynthia Smith, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Classical Study
563-588-7953 | Cynthia.Smith@loras.edu

John Waldmeir
Professor of Religious Studies
563-588-7966 | John.Waldmeir@loras.edu

Dr. Waldmeir teaches courses on religion and culture, sacred scripture, and world religions. A member of the Loras faculty for sixteen years, he has published four books, most recently Cathedrals of Bone, The Role of the Body in Contemporary Catholic Literature. A fifth book on the contemporary Catholic Church in Ireland, is forthcoming. He has held the annual John Cardinal O’Connor Chair for Catholic Studies twice at Loras, and recently won the Cardinal Newman Award for outstanding campus teaching and leadership.

Rev. Douglas Wathier, S.T.D.
Interim Vice-President for Academic Affairs
Professor of Theology
Director of Catholic Thinkers and Leaders Program
563-588-7013 | Douglas.Wathier@loras.edu

Fr. Wathier received S.T.D. (Sacrae Theologiae Doctor) from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome, with an emphasis on the transmission of revelation and the act of faith. He teaches courses in the Catholic Thinkers and Leaders Program, including Character and the Catholic Intellectual Tradition; The Once and Future Church; The Displaced Person: Human Dignity and Human Rights; Councils, Creeds and Culture; Belief and Unbelief and the Good Life; and Leadership Seminar for Social Justice. He also teaches christology and ecclesiology in the graduate program, offers J-term courses with travel in Germany and Italy. Fr. Wathier is the Director of the Catholic Thinkers and Leaders Program, and serves as an instructor in the Archdiocese of Dubuque’s Deacon Formation Program.

Fr. Wathier’s academic interests include Catholic Identity in Higher Education. He has been invited to give presentations about this topic at Arizona State University and Fordham University. He also has given a presentation about the reception of revelation and the clerical abuse scandal at Georgetown University.

Lee Zhu, Ph.D.
Professor of History
563-588-7199 | Lee.Zhu@loras.edu

Dr. Lee S. Zhu was born in China. He received his doctorate degree from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He teaches East Asian History, Russian history and the history of the Second World War and the Cold War. His research interests center on the history of the Soviet Union during the Stalin period and the history of the People’s Republic of China during the Mao years. Dr. Lee conducted research in archives in Moscow, Shanghai and Beijing, and he published several scholarly articles examining the impact of the Communist ideology on Soviet and Chinese education. He took students on summer research trips and January-term trips to China.