January Term Extensive Travel Courses

Loras College 2020 January Term
Extensive Travel Course Descriptions

 

L.BUS-490: Business Seminar
Professor Hugh Graham
Location of travel: San Francisco, California
Course fee: $2,000

This study travel course will focus on development and application of business knowledge, exploration of world class organizations and business leaders, and service to community. Class activities will include in-depth study of current events, a comprehensive and competitive simulation and in-depth field experience of world class organizations/leaders. Anticipated out-of-pocket expenses include most meals, some entrance fees, and personal shopping. Prerequisites for this course: ACC 227, CIT 110 or CIT 321, BUS 230, BUS 240, and BUS 350. Registration restricted to Senior Business Administration, Marketing, Finance or MIS majors. Instructor’s permission required. 3 credits.

L.COM-289: Global Filmmaking
Professor Craig Schaefer
Location of travel: Italy or Greece
Course fee: $3,600

This is an international film production course and we’re going to be producing video on location just like the pro’s. Students in this course should be prepared to travel extensively and tell outstanding visual stories. Global Filmmaking is an experiential creative production course with a focus on group work. Nearly all of your efforts will contribute to the larger group goal of producing a high quality production. Prior to our flight, class sessions on the Loras campus will be working sessions on preproduction creative. Most class sessions during January will be used to shoot on location. You will also be making script adjustments at that time. Upon return, class periods will focus on post-production. Students must have completed COM-158: Introduction to TV Production OR receive instructor permission. Additional out-of-pocket expenses include some meals. 3 credits.

 

L.EGR-250: NASA Astronautics
Professor Danial Neebel
Location of travel: Houston, Texas
Course fee: $2,000

This course is intended for anyone interested in what it takes to travel and live in space and on other worlds. Hands-on project-based learning that includes sustainable habitat construction, strategic scientific planning and investigations, a two-stage rocket launch, heat shield design, cryogenics chamber design, robotics, underwater “astronaut training,” collaborative teaming and global awareness development. The course will include tours of and activities in actual astronaut training and work facilities, such as NASA  Johnson Space Center, Rocket Park and the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory. Hear from guest speakers about what it takes to work at NASA and the projects that prepare humans for space exploration. Registration restricted to Science, Technology, Engineering, or Mathematics majors. Additional out-ofpocket expenses include some dinners, snacks on travel days, and souvenirs. The prerequisite is MAT 117 or higher or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

L.EXP-240: Global Service Learning: Haiti (AC)
Professor Eric Eller
Location of travel: Haiti
Course fee: $2,150

This is a study travel with a focus on learning about Haitian culture through performing community service within that culture. The earthquake that struck Haiti on January 12, 2010 brought to the public’s attention the plight of the Haitian people. News coverage was extensive and donations poured in to help.

This course explores the situation in Haiti before the earthquake hit, the international response to the disaster, and the current state of affairs. The course will include significant pre-travel research into the cultural aspects of the destination, including its history, politics, economics, and religion, followed by 8- 11 days of travel to immerse within that culture while serving the host community. The service aspect for this course is primarily through building houses, although there are also opportunities for those in premedical fields to assist at the medical clinic of the NGO we work with. This is HARD work…hot, exhausting, tiring work and we are staying in a bunkhouse at a medical clinic where there only brief, cold showers. This course is not about being comfortable; to the contrary, we seek to take you out of your comfort zone, because beyond the comfort zone is where much learning takes place. Excursions are tentatively planned to the beach, Sunday morning church, downtown to see earthquake damage, and to the National museum. All meals are included in the course fee. Anticipated out-of-pocket expenses may include work gloves, supplies, and potential immunizations. There are no prerequisites for the course. 3 credits.

PHI-376: Philosophy and the Rise of Christianity (AC)
Father William M. Joensen
Location of travel: Italy
Course fee: $3,800

This study travel course ventures to Sicily and Rome where love for wisdom has not been left in ruins; participants examine ancient and contemporary Mediterranean cultures and analyze how key concepts, themes, and attitudes of selected ancient philosophers informed theologians and prominent figures of the early Christian era. Graeco-Roman archaeological sites and theaters are explored in Siracusa, in the famous “Valley of the Temples” in Agrigento, in Taormina (with the volcanic Mt. Etna looming in view), in Palermo, and of course, in the Eternal City, Rome. In both Sicily and Rome we will be guided through museums, catacombs and churches where early martyrs are venerated and Mass will be celebrated, including in St. Peter’s Basilica at the Vatican, where we hope to encounter Pope Francis. Anticipated out-of-pocket expenses include costs of roughly $300 for occasional meals, offerings, and miscellaneous expenses. Besides the usual advanced general education prerequisites, it is desirable that students would have already taken one philosophy or theology course. 3 credits.

RST-273: Social Justice & Concerns (AV)
Professor Jacob Kohlhaas
Location of travel: Kenya
Course fee: $4,000

This interdisciplinary J-Term travel course will explore social issues in Kenya through critical ethical reflection on social concerns and engagement with the practices of social work professionals who serve communities in East Africa. Students will have the opportunity to collaborate with local community members and confront issues of economic change and/or instability, limited national resources, the organization of helping services, and government structures and arrangements that highlight challenges to the roles of social welfare and the daily practice of social work in unique cultural contexts. The course aims to help prepare students as ‘global citizens’ who can responsibly contribute within an increasingly interconnected world. 3 credits.