APPLIED PHYSICS MINOR

APPLIED PHYSICS MINOR
Division of Mathematics, Engineering & Computer Science
Robert Keller, Ph.D., Chair
robert.keller@loras.edu
563.588.7105

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Requirements for minor

Requirements for the minor in Applied Physics:
L.PHY-223-224 or equivalent is a prerequisite for all courses numbered 300 or higher.

Req Course Cr’s
1 L.MAT-150: Calculus of One Variable I 4
2 L.MAT-160: Calculus of One Variable II 4
3 L.PHY-208: Astronomy-AH 4
4 L.PHY-223: Physics for Scientists and Engineers I 5
5 L.PHY-224: Physics for Scientists and Engineers II 5
6 L.PHY-290: Physics Lab I 0
7 L.PHY-291: Physics Lab II 0
8 L.PHY-331: Modern Physics 3
9 L.MAT-260: Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 4
29 total required credits
Course Descriptions

L.MAT-150: Calculus of One Variable I

A study of the basic concepts and techniques of analytic geometry, differential and integral calculus of functions of one variable, and applications to calculus-based models. Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency in L.MAT-113 and 117 or equivalent or placement into L.MAT 150. 4 credits.

L.MAT-160: Calculus of One Variable II

Further study of the integral calculus of functions of one variable and an introduction to sequences, series, and differential equations. Prerequisite: L.MAT-150 or equivalent. 4 credits.

L.PHY-208: Astronomy-AH

This course engages students in an exploration of the utility of scientific models in interpreting the vast complexity in the observable universe. The scientific models are developed through student-centered observations and explorations. The objectives of this course are to promote quantitative as well as qualitative skills in the study of celestial observations and motions, the analysis of astrophysical spectra, comparative planetary geology, and the structure of stars and galaxies as well as their genesis and evolution. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and a Mathematical Modeling (-FM) course. 4 credits.

L.PHY-223: Physics for Scientists & Engineers I

Introductory calculus-based physics that satisfies requirements for programs in the mathematical, engineering, chemical and physical sciences. Topics include mechanics, heat, and sound. Four class periods and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: L.MAT-150 (co-requisite optional), L.MAT-160. Corequisite: L.PHY-290. 5 credits.

L.PHY-224: Physics for Scientists & Engineers II

A continuation of L.PHY-223. Introductory calculus-based physics that satisfies requirements for programs in the mathematical, engineering, chemical and physical sciences. Topics include electricity, magnetism and optics, as well as introductory quantum, atomic and nuclear physics. Prerequisites: L.PHY-223; L.MAT-160. Corequisite: L.PHY-291. Four class periods and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 5 credits.

L.PHY-290: Physics Lab I

Three-hour laboratory course to accompany L.PHY-210 and L.PHY-223. Students work in groups to conduct experiments designed to help understanding of lecture material. Must be taken with concurrently with the lecture class. Corequisite: L.PHY-210 or L.PHY-223. 0 credits.

L.PHY-291: Physics Lab II

Three-hour laboratory course to accompany L.PHY-211 and L.PHY-224. Students work in groups to conduct experiments designed to help understanding of lecture material. Must be taken concurrently with the lecture class. Corequisite: L.PHY-211 or L.PHY-224. 0 credits.

L.PHY-331: Modern Physics

A discussion of the modern knowledge of the nature and properties of electrons, photons, atoms and molecules. Topics include the fundamental experiments of quantum physics, atomic spectra and structure, special relativity, and an introduction to quantum mechanics. Prerequisites: L.PHY-224 and L.MAT-260. 3 credits.

L.MAT-260: Analytic Geometry and Calculus III

A study of partial differentiation and multiple integration, elementary vector analysis and applications of these concepts. Prerequisite: L.MAT-160 or placement into L.MAT-260. 4 credits.

Questions? Contact Us!

Thomas Carstens, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Engineering
563.588.7186 | Thomas.Carstens@loras.edu

Curriculum Vitae

Thomas Carstens is an Assistant Professor of Engineering at Loras College. Tom has taught at Marquette University, University of Wisconsin-Platteville, and at Loras College since earning his Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering in 2013 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Tom has worked with NASA and the Office of Naval Research through different fellowship programs.

Kenneth McLaughlin, Ph.D.
Professor of Physics
Professor of Engineering
563.588.7581 | Kenneth.McLaughlin@loras.edu

Curriculum Vitae

I grew up in the South; my dad was in the Air Force so we moved a few times until we settled next door to my grandfather’s farm where I helped raise horses, cattle, pigs and goats.  I could ‘shoe’ my horse by the time I was thirteen and I have a nasty scar from an early mishap.  My Boy Scout troop was a fully ‘mounted patrol’ with our horses accompanying us on every campout and we rode in the state fair and major parades every year.  Growing up in rural settings, I became fascinated with the night sky.  When I learned that we can decipher what the stars are made of by analyzing their starlight, I was hooked on interpreting the natural world in terms of the atoms and molecules from which things are made of.

I have spent multiple summers and many spring and winter breaks investigating the atomic realm by running experiments at Berkeley National Laboratory.  I am also involved in astrophysics research, spending clear nights under the stars in our campus observatory.  These research projects have been funded by multiple National Science Foundation grants as well as Iowa College Foundation grants along with grants from Verizon and the Alliant Energy Foundation.  Students have taken part in planning and accomplishing this research as well as co-authoring peer-reviewed publications as well as presenting at national and regional conferences.

 

Kristen Stauffer-Thompson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Engineering
563.588.7122 | Kristen.Thompson@loras.edu

Dr. Thompson earner her Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin Madison where she studied Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV). Before attending graduate school she worked at IBM as a Manufacturing Engineer processing printed circuit boards. She earned her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Michigan Technological University and is originally from the far west suburbs of Chicago. Her research interests continue to lie within the field of virology.