Engineering

Follow your passion for Engineering

The Loras College Engineering program provides students the opportunity to develop strong technical and design skills. Studying Engineering at Loras is an experience in the wide variety of topics within mechanical engineering and electrical engineering such as analyzing and controlling dynamic systems, electrical circuits, and computer programming. The interdisciplinary nature of the degree fits very well into a liberal arts college, whose goal it is to produce broadly-educated graduates.

ABETThe Loras College Engineering Program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org. Our ABET accreditation ensures our Engineering program meets the highest quality standards. We are one of only a few Engineering programs in Iowa accredited by ABET.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
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THE ENGINEERING STUDENT EXPERIENCE

The student experience is a vital component to college success. Loras Engineering students have engaged in activities such as; building solar panels, designing a gaming console, placed at regional design contests, and much more.

  • Building solar panels at our adopted Catholic high school in Haiti which allowed students to apply their engineering knowledge, advance their commitment to sustainability and provide service to those who are truly in need.
  • Introducing the “E-Walk” so that Loras personnel from the Provost to Campus Safety staff can traverse the campus in sustainable, affordable and efficient ways.
  • Creating the Loras logo for entry signs to the College as a senior capstone to demonstrate an ability to work collaboratively and provide a lasting gift to their alma mater.
  • Serving a Dubuque Stamp and Manufacturing Internship whereby our students designed the entire 40,000 square foot facility expansion.
  • Designing a functional, programmable, and user-friendly gaming console (e.g., Wii, Xbox) or green board that was selected as the first place winner at a prestigious regional competition.
  • For the past two years 100% of Loras Engineering graduates have passed a mock assessment of the national Fundamental of Engineering exam (50% is the national average).

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Loras College offers a high quality education with a small school atmosphere.

  • Dedicated Engineering Faculty who all have a Ph.D. degrees and industrial experience at such companies as Dow, IBM, Trane, and Stinar.
  • Most Engineering majors apply classroom concepts during internships. These internships are typically done in the summer. The proximity to employers means that students can also work at an internship part-time while still in school.
  • Students engage in design projects starting during the first year and continuing to the major senior design project.
Student Learning Outcomes
Student Learning Outcomes – Engineering 
1. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics.
2. An ability to apply both analysis and synthesis in the engineering design process, resulting in designs that meet desired needs.
3 An ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions.
4. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
5. An ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts.
6. An ability to recognize the ongoing need for additional knowledge and locate, evaluate, integrate, and apply this knowledge appropriately.
7. An ability to function effectively on teams that establish goals, plan tasks, meet deadlines, and analyze risk and uncertainty.
Major Requirements

ENGINEERING
Division of Mathematics, Engineering & Computer Science
Robert Keller, Ph.D., Chair
robert.keller@loras.edu
563.588.7015

The engineering program offers three tracks to earn a B.S. in Engineering. These tracks are Biomedical, Computer, and Electromechanical. Each of these tracks focuses on both theory and design related to the track.  Graduates of the Biomedical track are prepared to design and test electrical and mechanical systems that interface with biological systems.  The Computer track emphasizes the development of computer controlled electrical and mechanical systems.  The Electromechanical track deals with the design, development and test of mechanical systems with electronic controls.

Requirements for the major in Engineering (B.S.) – Biomedical track:
A grade of C- or better is required in all courses taken for the major.

Req Course Cr’s
1 L.CHE-111: General Chemistry I 4
2 L. CHE-223: Organic Chemistry I 4
3 L. BIO-115 : Biology I 4
Select one from Req 4: 
4 L. BIO-225: Anatomy & Physiology 4
4 L. BIO-420: Vert Physiology 4
5 L.MAT-150: Calculus of One Variable I-FM 4
6 L.MAT-160: Calculus of One Variable II 4
7 L.MAT-260: Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 4
8 L.MAT-310: Ordinary Differential Equations 3
9 L.PHY-223: Physics for Engineers I 5
10 L.PHY-224: Physics for Engineers II 5
11 L.PHY-290: Physics Lab I 0
12 L.PHY-291: Physics Lab II 0
13 L.EGR-105: Intro to Engineering I 3
14 L.EGR-116: Intro to Programming with Robotics 4
15 L.EGR-231: Engineering Statics 3
16 L.EGR-232: Engineering Dynamics 3
17 L.EGR-236: Properties and Mechanics of Materials 4
18 L.EGR-308: Biomechanics & Biomaterials
19 L.EGR-333: Fluid Mechanics 3
20 L.EGR-334: Thermodynamics 3
21 L.EGR-335: Electric Circuits 3
22 L.EGR-342: Modeling and Control of Dynamic Systems 3
23 L.EGR-350: Engineering Laboratory I 1
24 L.EGR-351: Engineering Laboratory II 1
25 L.EGR-352: Engineering Laboratory III 1
26 L.EGR-353: Engineering Laboratory IV 1
Select one from Req 27: Engineering Elective 
27 L.EGR-200: Engineering Prototyping 3
27 L.EGR-250: NASA 3
27 L.CIT-225: Data Structures & Algorithms 4
27 L.CIT-319 Computer Organization & Architecture 4
28 L.EGR-490: Engineering Capstone Design I-PJ 3
29 L.EGR-491: Engineering Capstone Design II 3
30 L.EGR-492: Engineering Capstone Design III 3
89 total required credits

Requirements for the major in Engineering (B.S.) – Computer track:
A grade of C- or better is required in all courses taken for the major.

Req Course Cr’s
1 L.CHE-111: General Chemistry I 4
2 L.CIT-225: Data Structures & Algorithms 4
3 L.CIT-319: Computer Organization & Architecture 4
4 L.MAT-150: Calculus of One Variable I-FM 4
5 L.MAT-160: Calculus of One Variable II 4
6 L.MAT-230:  Discrete Mathematics 3
7 L.MAT-310: Ordinary Differential Equations 3
8 L.PHY-223: Physics for Engineers I 5
9 L.PHY-224: Physics for Engineers II 5
10 L.PHY-290: Physics Lab I 0
11 L.PHY-291: Physics Lab II 0
12 L.EGR-105: Intro to Engineering I 3
13 L.EGR-116:  Intro to Programming with Robotics 4
14 L.EGR-231: Engineering Statics 3
15 L.EGR-232: Engineering Dynamics 3
16 L.EGR-335: Electric Circuits 3
17 L.EGR-342: Modeling and Control of Dynamic Systems 3
18 L.EGR-350: Engineering Laboratory I 1
19 L.EGR-352: Engineering Laboratory III 1
20 L.CIT-325: Algorithm Design & Analysis 3
21 L.CIT-440: Operating Systems 3
Select one from Req 22: Computer Science Elective 
22 L.CIT-332: Web Programming 3
22 L.CIT-310: Artificial Intelligence 3
22 L.CIT-311: Human Computer Interaction 3
22 L.CIT-340: Machine Learning 3
22 L.CIT-350: Computer Graphics 3
Select one from Req 23: Engineering Elective 
23 L.EGR-200: Engineering Prototyping 3
23 L.EGR-250: NASA Astronautics 3
23 L.EGR-236: Properties and Mechanics of Materials 4
23 L.EGR-308: Biomechanics & Biomaterials 3
23 L.EGR-333: Fluid Mechanics 3
23 L.EGR-334: Thermodynamics 3
24 L.EGR-490: Engineering Capstone Design I-PJ 3
25 L.EGR-491: Engineering Capstone Design II 3
26 L.EGR-492: Engineering Capstone Design III 3
78 total required credits

Requirements for the major in Engineering (B.S.) – Electro-mechanical track:
A grade of C- or better is required in all courses taken for the major.

Req Course Cr’s
1 L.CHE-111: General Chemistry I 4
2 L.CIT-225: Data Structures & Algorithms 4
3 L.CIT-319: Computer Organization & Architecture 4
4 L.MAT-150: Calculus of One Variable I-FM 4
5 L.MAT-160: Calculus of One Variable II 4
6 L.MAT-260: Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 4
7 L.MAT-310: Ordinary Differential Equations 3
8 L.PHY-223: Physics for Engineers I 5
9 L.PHY-224: Physics for Engineers II 5
10 L.PHY-290: Physics Lab I 0
11 L.PHY-291: Physics Lab II 0
12 L.EGR-105: Intro to Engineering I 3
13 L.EGR-116:  Intro to Programming with Robotics 4
14 L.EGR-231: Engineering Statics 3
15 L.EGR-232: Engineering Dynamics 3
16 L.EGR-236: Properties and Mechanics of Materials 4
17 L.EGR-333: Fluid Mechanics 3
18 L.EGR-334: Thermodynamics 3
19 L.EGR-335: Electric Circuits 3
20 L.EGR-342: Modeling and Control of Dynamic Systems 3
21 L.EGR-350: Engineering Laboratory I 1
22 L.EGR-351: Engineering Laboratory II 1
23 L.EGR-352: Engineering Laboratory III 1
24 L.EGR-353: Engineering Laboratory IV 1
Select one from Req 25: Engineering Elective 
25 L.EGR-200: Engineering Prototyping 3
25 L.EGR-250: NASA Astronautics 3
25 L.EGR-308: Biomechanics & Biomaterials 3
25 L.CIT-325: Algorithm Design & Analysis 3
25 L.CIT-332: Web Programming 3
25 L.CIT-440: Operating Systems 3
25 L.CIT-310: Artificial Intelligence 3
25 L.CIT-311: Human Computer Interaction 3
25 L.CIT-340: Machine Learning 3
25 L.CIT-350: Computer Graphics 3
26 L.EGR-490: Engineering Capstone Design I-PJ 3
27 L.EGR-491: Engineering Capstone Design II 3
28 L.EGR-492: Engineering Capstone Design III 3
82 total required credits

Requirements for the minor in Engineering:
A grade of C- or better is required in all courses taken for the minor.

Req Course Cr’s
1 L.EGR-105: Intro to Engineering I 3
2 L.EGR-231: Engineering Statics 3
3 L.PHY-223: Physics for Engineers I 5
4 L.MAT-150: Calculus of One Variable I 4
4 L.MAT-160: Calculus of One Variable II 4
Select two from Req 5
5 L.EGR-116: Intro to Programming with Robotics 4
5 L.EGR-232: Engineering Dynamics 3
5 L.EGR-236: Properties and Mechanics of Materials 4
5 L.EGR-200: Engineering Prototyping 3
5 L.EGR-250: NASA Astronautics 3
5 L.EGR-308: Biomechanics & Biomaterials 3
5 L.EGR-333: Fluid Mechanics 3
5 L.EGR-334: Thermodynamics 3
5 L.EGR-335: Electronic Circuits 3
5 L.EGR-342: Modeling & Control of Dynamics Systems 3
25 to 27 total required credits
Course Descriptions

L.EGR-105: Intro to Engineering I

Introduction to the engineering profession and its disciplines. Introduction to engineering design. Visualization of objects. Manual sketching of pictorials (isometric, oblique). Solid modeling using SolidWorks CAD software. Multi-view projection theory and standard engineering drawing practices (reading, dimensioning, auxiliary views and section views). 3 credits.

L.EGR-106: Intro to Engineering II

Engineering design process applied to a team project involving the creation of a product that meets specific design specifications. The design project and other engineering problems will involve conceptualization, analysis, and implementation. Oral and written reports that are typical of engineering design process are required. Prerequisite: L.EGR-105. 3 credits.

L.EGR-116: Intro to Programming with Robotics

This course provides an introduction to programming using a single board computer module commonly applied in small robotics projects.  Students learn the basics of programming, variables, control statements, and functions as applied to programming real-time robotic systems.  Prerequisite: L.MAT 117. 4 credits.

L.EGR-200: Engineering Prototyping

This course serves as an introduction to engineering design prototypes.  The primary focus will be on the design, prototype, and test processes associated with creating a prototype.  These prototypes will target designing electromechanical or biomedical systems.  Skills practiced include teaming, project and time management, locating materials and services, conflict resolution, experimental design, oral and written reports. Students will complete self-reflection and self-assessment exercises.   3 credits.

L.EGR-231: Engineering Statics

An introduction to engineering statics. Topics include vectors, resultants, equilibrium, structural analysis, centroids, shear and bending moment diagrams, friction, and moment of inertia. Prerequisite: L.MAT-150 or above. 3 credits.

L.EGR-232: Engineering Dynamics

An introduction to engineering dynamics. Topics include kinematics and kinetics (displacement, velocity, acceleration, work, energy, impulse, and momentum) for particles and rigid bodies. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing; L.EGR-231. 3 credits.

L.EGR-236: Properties & Mechanics of Materials

Introduction to materials and solid mechanics of typical engineering materials. Introduces basic theory of deformable bodies by analyzing stress/strain relationships in objects. Topics in solid mechanics include strains, stresses, Mohr’s Circle, deflections of beams, and simple structural members. Prerequisites: L.MAT­160 or higher, L.EGR-231. 4 credits.

L.EGR-242: Manufacturing Processes & Design

Method of commercial manufacturing. Includes topics of casting, forging, forming, joining, cutting, drilling, milling, and lathe work. Also includes: designing parts to make them easy to manufacture, workshop laboratories where students learn basic use and safety of metal and wood working equipment; completion of a project where students design and construct a project of their choosing; and tours of local manufacturing facilities. There are no prerequisites although a CAD background may be helpful. 3 credits. January term.

L.EGR-250: NASA Astronautics

Hands-on, engineering-based activities and with data collection technology integration for real-world analysis.  Project-based learning that includes sustainable habitat construction, strategic scientific planning and investigations, a two-stage rocket launch, heat shield design, cryogenics chamber design, robotics underwater “astronaut training,” collaborative teaming and global awareness development.  Behind-the-scenes access to including tours of actual astronaut training and work facilities, such as NASA Johnson Space Center, Rocket Park and the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory.  Hear from guest speakers about what it takes to work at NASA and the projects that prepare humans for space exploration.  Prerequisite:  MAT 117 or higher. 3 credits.

L.EGR-308: Biomechanics and Biomaterials

This course provides an introduction to the interaction of artificial components with both the in vivo mechanics and biochemistry.  Specific topics include the structure, function, and mechanical properties of biological tissues and biomaterials as well as biological responses and toxicity. This information is used then to identify the optimal materials to use for a variety of biomedical applications (drug delivery, stents, replacement joints, etc.) This course is required for the Biomedical Engineering option but will also be open to other students on campus interested in the subject. This includes in particular pre-heath students who want to have a better understanding of biomechanics and biomaterials. Prerequisites: L.CHE-111, L.PHY-223. 3 credits.

L.EGR-333: Fluid Mechanics

The laws of fluid statics and dynamics. Topics include properties of substances, fluid statics, the energy equation, the momentum equation, and viscous effects in external and internal flows. Prerequisites: L.CHE-111; L.EGR-232; L.MAT-260; L.PHY-224. 3 credits.

L.EGR-334: Thermodynamics

The laws of thermodynamics. Topics include: properties of substances and phase equilibrium, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, entropy, power cycles and refrigeration cycles. Prerequisites: L.CHE-111; L.EGR-232; L.MAT-260; L.PHY-224. 3 credits.

L.EGR-335: Electric Circuits

Introduction to DC and AC circuit analysis using Laplace Transforms, Kirchhoff’s laws, network simplification, nodal and loop techniques. Consideration of amplifiers, power supplies and discrete circuit elements including resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, transistors, and operational amplifiers. Introduction to circuit analysis tools. Prerequisites: L.PHY-224; L.MAT-310. 4 credits.

L.EGR-342: Modeling & Control of Dynamic Systems

Modeling and analysis of dynamic systems and controls in the electrical and mechanical realms. Categories of models include linear vs. nonlinear, 1st vs. 2nd order, continuous vs. discrete, transient, steady-state, and frequency responses. Open-loop and closed-loop control systems. Modeling will include computer simulations. Prerequisites: L.EGR-232; L.MAT-260, L.MAT-310; L.EGR-116 or equivalent; L.PHY-224. 3 credits. 

L.EGR-350: Engineering Laboratory I

This is a laboratory course associated with the L.EGR-335: Electric Circuits course. A lab course in which students design, build and test electric circuits of various types. Circuits that interface with mechanical systems are emphasized. Prerequisites: L.MAT-310; L.EGR-116 or equivalent; L.PHY-224. Co-requisite: L.EGR-335. 1 credit.

L.EGR-351: Engineering Laboratory II

This is a laboratory course associated with the L.EGR-333: Fluid Dynamics course. This course will be focused on examining phenomena in fluid flow such as fluid statics, fluid energy, momentum, internal flows, drag, and viscous effects. This course will integrate engineering topics such as thermodynamics, controls, dynamic systems, circuits, dynamics and statics. Prerequisites: L.EGR-232; L.MAT-260, L.MAT-310; LEGR-116 or equivalent; L.PHY-224. Co-requisite: L.EGR-333. 1 credit.

L.EGR-352: Engineering Laboratory III

This is a laboratory course associated with the L.EGR-342: Dynamic Systems course. This course will be focused on examining phenomena in modeling and control of systems in the mechanical and electrical realms. This course will integrate engineering topics such as thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, circuits, dynamics and statics. Prerequisites: L.EGR-232; L.MAT-260, L.MAT-310; L.EGR-116 or equivalent; L.PHY-224. Co-requisite: L.EGR-342. 1 credit.

L.EGR-353: Engineering Laboratory IV

This is a laboratory course associated with the L.EGR-334: Thermodynamics course. This course will be focused on modeling of thermodynamic systems (such as heat transfer and power cycles) and design of thermodynamics systems. This course will integrate engineering topics such as fluid dynamics, dynamic systems, circuits, dynamics and statics. Prerequisites: L.EGR-232; L.MAT-260, L.MAT-310; L.EGR-116 or equivalent; L.PHY-224. Co-requisite: L.EGR-334. 1 credit.

L.EGR-490: Engineering Capstone Design I-PJ

First part of year-long, multidisciplinary team-based, open-ended engineering design project. Projects will target designing electromechanical systems. Skills practiced include teaming, project and time management, conflict resolution, literature search, job search, experimental design, oral and written reports. Prerequisites: L.EGR-105, L.EGR-116, L.EGR-231, L.EGR-232, two 300+ level L.EGR courses, and L.MAT-310. Completion of three of the five AGE categories is highly recommended. 3 credits.

L.EGR-491: Engineering Capstone Design II

Second part of year-long, team-based, open-ended engineering design project. Projects will target designing electromechanical systems. Skills practiced include teaming, project and time management, locating materials and services, conflict resolution, experimental design, oral and written reports. Design process will consist of students taking part in a simulated industrial work place setting. Students will interact with local companies to evaluate and access available resources and services. Students will complete self-reflection and self-assessment exercises. Prerequisite: L.EGR-490. 3 credits. January term.

L.EGR-492: Engineering Capstone Design III

Third part of year-long, team-based, open-ended engineering design project. Projects will target designing electromechanical systems. Skills practiced include analysis and assessment, testing, redesign, project and time management, oral and written reports. Culmination of the project will include a poster presentation, formal written report, and team oral presentation. Course will also include preparation and review of topics for taking of the FE Examination. Prerequisite: L.EGR-491.
3 credits.

RELATED COURSES: Computing & Information Technology, Mathematics

ABET Accreditation

ABETThe Loras College Engineering Program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org. Our ABET accreditation ensures our Engineering program meets the highest quality standards. We are one of only a few Engineering programs in Iowa accredited by ABET.

Loras Engineering Program Mission
The engineering program engages students in a rigorous, challenging, and comprehensive study of the fundamentals in engineering, mathematics, and science required to analyze, design, build, test and operate electromechanical systems in a manner that emphasizes interdisciplinary leadership that contributes to the profession and to society.

Program Educational Objectives:
Within 3 to 5 years after graduation, graduates of the engineering program at Loras College will demonstrate the following:

  • The ability to employ their knowledge and skills in the fundamentals of engineering in one or more of the following pursuits:
    • Demonstrating proficiency in the engineering profession performing one or more of the following: research and development activities of design, build, test, verification, and documentation.
    • Studying in a graduate school program in engineering or a closely related field.
    • Using their problem solving and analytical skills to benefit society in a positive way through volunteer work or in a nonprofit organization.
  • Strong ethical standards and a sense of stewardship with economic and ecological resources consistent with Catholic Social Teaching.

Upon graduation from the Loras Engineering Program a student will have demonstrated the following:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, ethical, safety, and manufacturability.
  • An ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams.
  • An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems using appropriate mathematics, science, and engineering knowledge.
  • An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  • An ability to communicate effectively.
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues.
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Enrollment:

  • 2018 Declared Engineering Majors: 27
  • 2018 Graduating Class: 9
Iowa Space Grant Consortium Affiliate

In December 2016, Loras College was voted by the Iowa Space Grant Consortium (ISGC) executive committee to become an academic affiliate with the ISGC.  The mission of NASA’s Space Grant Program is to contribute to the nation’s science enterprise by funding education, research, and informal education projects.  ISGC goal is to improve aerospace science, research, education, and outreach activities throughout the state.  Loras College is the first new academic member since the creation of ISGC.  Other academic affiliates include Iowa State University, University of Iowa, University of Northern Iowa, and Drake University. There are also government agencies, industrial partners, and nonprofit organizations working together in the ISGC.  Collaboration is encourage among the various partners.  As an academic affiliate, Loras College faculty will be eligible to apply for funding through ISGC competitions in higher education and research infrastructure programs.  Faculty can use these opportunities to conduct applied research and develop course curriculum dealing with NASA research areas.  Students will be eligible to apply to NASA internships, fellowships, and scholarships directly through ISGC or through NASA.  Students now have the opportunity to take what they learned in class room and applied it to a current NASA research area or project.  Read Full Article

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The Loras Engineering Program is committed to developing  professional students that excel in the field of engineering.  Graduates have gone on to exciting careers at companies such as Entegree, Epic, John Deere, Rockwell Collins, and Vermeerin or continue their education in graduate school. Your career could take off into one of these fields:

  • Process Engineer
  • Medical Doctor
  • Systems Engineer
  • Manufacturing Engineer
  • Work Designer
  • Design Engineer
  • Robotics
  • Quality Engineer
  • Manufacturing Engineer
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Questions? Contact Us!

Thomas Carstens, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Engineering
563.588.7186 | Thomas.Carstens@loras.edu

Curriculum Vitae

Thomas Carstens is an Assistant Professor of Engineering at Loras College. Tom has taught at Marquette University, University of Wisconsin-Platteville, and at Loras College since earning his Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering in 2013 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Tom has worked with NASA and the Office of Naval Research through different fellowship programs.

Kenneth McLaughlin, Ph.D.
Professor of Physics
Professor of Engineering
563.588.7581 | Kenneth.McLaughlin@loras.edu

Curriculum Vitae

I grew up in the South; my dad was in the Air Force so we moved a few times until we settled next door to my grandfather’s farm where I helped raise horses, cattle, pigs and goats.  I could ‘shoe’ my horse by the time I was thirteen and I have a nasty scar from an early mishap.  My Boy Scout troop was a fully ‘mounted patrol’ with our horses accompanying us on every campout and we rode in the state fair and major parades every year.  Growing up in rural settings, I became fascinated with the night sky.  When I learned that we can decipher what the stars are made of by analyzing their starlight, I was hooked on interpreting the natural world in terms of the atoms and molecules from which things are made of.

I have spent multiple summers and many spring and winter breaks investigating the atomic realm by running experiments at Berkeley National Laboratory.  I am also involved in astrophysics research, spending clear nights under the stars in our campus observatory.  These research projects have been funded by multiple National Science Foundation grants as well as Iowa College Foundation grants along with grants from Verizon and the Alliant Energy Foundation.  Students have taken part in planning and accomplishing this research as well as co-authoring peer-reviewed publications as well as presenting at national and regional conferences.

 

Danial Neebel, Ph.D., PE
Professor of Engineering and Computer Science
563.588.7815 | Danial.Neebel@loras.edu

Dr. Danial Neebel studied in the pre-engineering program at Loras and earned his bachelor’s degree in Computer Engineering from Iowa State.  He went from there to the Trane Co. where he worked as an electronic controls engineer designing microcontroller based systems to control HVAC equipment.  In 1988, he went back to school and earned a Masters and PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  Upon completion of his PhD, he moved to Harrisonburg, VA to help start the Integrated Science and Technology program before returning to Loras College, his alma mater.  Since returning to Loras, he has helped shape the Engineering and Computer Science programs. 

During the 2013-2014 academic year he served as a Visiting Professor at the US Air Force Academy in the departments of electrical and computer engineering and computer science. His research interests include digital system design and testing, computer architecture, and computer science and engineering education.

Kristen Stauffer-Thompson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Engineering
563.588.7122 | Kristen.Thompson@loras.edu

Dr. Thompson earner her Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin Madison where she studied Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV). Before attending graduate school she worked at IBM as a Manufacturing Engineer processing printed circuit boards. She earned her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Michigan Technological University and is originally from the far west suburbs of Chicago. Her research interests continue to lie within the field of virology.