History

The History program at Loras College combines the personal attention students receive at a small private college with a broad curriculum that is usually available only at a large institution. We offer courses that cover every historical period around the globe. Whether you are interested in ancient, medieval or modern history, or want to concentrate on American, European or non-Western history, you can find relevant courses in our curriculum.

The History program places special emphasis on developing academic skills, such as identifying historical problems that need further inquiry, finding and evaluating primary sources and making an original and sophisticated argument based on the critical investigation of evidence. The historical discipline values these skills as central to becoming an historian, and additionally, the ability to work in a learning community and produce new knowledge through the interpretation of primary materials can be applied to many career choices.

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LORAS PROVIDES A STIMULATING SOCIAL CALENDAR OFFERING STUDENTS A DIVERSE ARRAY OF EVENTS

From clubs and organizations to theater productions, concerts, athletic events, musical performances, intercultural programs, spiritual opportunities, there is so much for students to choose from.

Loras College provides a stimulating social climate for the campus and allows students to enjoy a diverse array of programs and entertainment.

On any given night of the week, students can enjoy a number of social opportunities. From clubs and organizations to theater productions, athletic events, musical performances, intercultural programs and spiritual opportunities, there is so much for students to choose from. In addition, the College Activities Board provides a variety of entertainment including: comedians, game shows, coffeehouses and concerts every weekend.

In addition, the College Activities Board provides a variety of entertainment including: comedians, game shows, coffeehouses and concerts every weekend.

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HISTORY TEACHING ENDORSEMENTS

History students seeking certification to teach in secondary education have a few options:

  • U.S. History endorsement
  • World History endorsement
  • All Social Studies endorsement

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HISTORY MAJOR CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The historical discipline values these skills as central to becoming an historian, but the ability to work in a learning community and produce new knowledge through the interpretation of primary materials can be applied to many career choices upon graduation.

Managers, public relations specialists, high school teachers, librarians, public historians, accountants, lawyers and police officers (to name a few of the many careers our graduates choose) benefit from research skills, information literacy, the ability to persuade, proficiency in writing and the self confidence that comes from the public presentation of creative work.

A large proportion of our History graduates are social studies teachers in secondary education, primarily at school districts in Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin. Others have embarked on successful careers in various fields or elected to go to graduate or law school.

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Student Learning Outcomes
Student Learning Outcomes – History
1. Demonstrate the ability to understand historical discourse, including the ability to understand and evaluate competing interpretations of the past and theoretical and methodological approaches that have informed historical writing.
2. Demonstrate educated familiarity with multiple societies.
3. Demonstrate research skills, especially the ability to identify, collect, and sort out primary sources for a research project.
4. Demonstrate skills in critical thinking by analyzing, evaluating and synthesizing information from multiple historical sources and developing a persuasive argument supported by evidence.
5. Demonstrate strong skills for written communication.
6. Demonstrate strong skills for oral communication.
7. Demonstrate ability to cite sources in a manner consistent with professionals in the discipline of history.
Major Requirements

HISTORY
Division of Philosophical, Religious, Theological, Social & Cultural Studies
Richard Anderson, Ph.D., Chair
rick.anderson@loras.edu
563.588.7177

Requirements for the major in History (B.A.):
Students in the first year are advised to select from among 100- and 200- level courses (introductory level courses). Majors, in consultation with a faculty advisor, design a curriculum suited to their particular interests and professional needs. Division approval is required for acceptance as a major, for course distribution within the major, and for graduation. To complete the major, a student must complete L.HIS-288, L.HIS-489 and L.HIS-490 and maintain at least a 2.3 GPA in 33 credits of history courses taken for the major.

L.HIS-175, 288, 386, 489 and 490 must be taken at Loras College. History majors may apply up to 12 transfer credits toward their Loras degree. Credit will not be granted for online courses that do not require on-campus contact hours.

REQUIRED COURSES WHICH MUST BE TAKEN AT LORAS
L.HIS-175 Themes in World History (Required only for World and All Social Studies Teaching Endorsements)
L.HIS-288 The Historian as Investigator
L.HIS-386 U.S. Survey for Teachers (Required only for United States and All Social Studies Teaching Endorsements)
L.HIS-489 The Historical Thinker
L.HIS-490 The Professional Historian

Req Course Cr’s
1 L.HIS-288: The Historian as Investigator 3
2 L.HIS-175: Themes in World History (Required only for World and All Social Studies Teaching Endorsements) 3
3 L.HIS-386: U.S. Survey for Teachers (Required only for United States and All Social Studies Teaching Endorsements) 3
4 L.HIS-489: The Historical Thinker 3
5 L.HIS-490: The Professional Historian 3
6 Elective: Any L.HIS course 3
7 Elective: Any L.HIS course 3
8 Elective: Any L.HIS course 3
9 Elective: Any L.HIS course 3
10 Elective: Any Non-AGE L.HIS-300+ course 3
11 Elective: Any Non-AGE L.HIS-300+ course 3
12 Elective: Any Non-AGE L.HIS-300+ course 3
13 Elective: Any Non-AGE L.HIS-300+ course 3
33 total required credits

Requirements for the minor in History:
Two of the following six electives must be upper (300 or 400) level courses.

Req Course Cr’s
1 Elective: Any World history course 3
2 Elective: Any World history course 3
3 Elective: Any American history course 3
4 Elective: Any American history course 3
5 Elective: Any additional history course 3
6 Elective: Any additional history course 3
18 total required credits

AFRICAN HISTORY
L.HIS-161: Modern Africa since 1800
L.HIS-162: The Scramble for Africa
L.HIS-282: History as Film: Africa-AC
L.HIS-360: Southern Africa Since 1800

ASIAN HISTORY
L.HIS-272: Japan in the Modern World-AI
L.HIS-275: History As Film: East Asia
L.HIS-277: Modern Chinese History & Culture-AC

COMPARATIVE WORLD HISTORY
L.HIS-175: Themes in World History
L.HIS-248: The Cold War-AI
L.HIS-349: The Second World War
L.HIS-392: History as Film
L.HIS-404: Historical Geography

EUROPEAN HISTORY
L.HIS-116: Ancient Greek Civilization
L.HIS-117: Roman Civilization
L.HIS-140: Europe To 1750
L.HIS-141: Modern Europe Since 1750
L.HIS-245: The Celts-AC
L.HIS-249: Russian Civilization-AC
L.HIS-329: The Enlightenment
L.HIS-330: The French Revolution
L.HIS-340: The Age of Kings & Conversions: Medieval Europe, 476-1075
L.HIS-341: The Age of Love & Reason: Medieval Europe, 1075-1530
L.HIS-342: The Reformation-AI
L.HIS-343: Medieval Christianity
L.HIS-346: Isle of the Saints: A Study Tour-AI
L.HIS 348: Paris in the 1920s & 1930s

GENERAL HISTORY
L.HIS-288: The Historian as Investigator
L.HIS-333: Imperial Geographies-AA
L.HIS-395: Topics
L.HIS-489: The Historical Thinker
L.HIS-490: The Professional Historian
L.HIS-494: Internship in History

JANUARY TERM
L.HIS-125: The Forgotten Burial Ground: Understanding Dubuque through the Third Street Cemetery
L.HIS-162: The Scramble for Africa
L.HIS-232: Herbert Hoover & the Great Depression
L.HIS-279: Gandhi the Interfaith Peace-Builder-AV
L.HIS-285: The Arab-Israeli Conflict
L.HIS-344: Celtic Christianity & Roman Catholicism
L.HIS-365: Contemporary Urban Portugal

LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY
L.HIS-155: Introduction to Latin American History
L.HIS-255: United States/Latin American Relations
L.HIS-257: Modern Brazilian History & Culture-AC

UNITED STATES HISTORY
L.HIS-121: United States To 1877
L.HIS-122: United States Since 1865
L.HIS-229: African American History-AI
L.HIS-230: Community & Identity in the American West-AI
L.HIS-231: History of U.S. Sexuality-AV
L.HIS-235: Race & Gender Reform in the United States-AC
L.HIS-239: United States Women’s History-AC
L.HIS-320: Native American Archeology
L.HIS-386: United States Survey for Teachers
L.HIS-427: United States Catholicism
L.HIS-431: Revolutionary Era in the United States
L.HIS-439: The Creation of Modern America, 1877-1924
L.HIS-443: Civil War & Reconstruction
L.HIS-453: The Great Depression & the New Deal
L.HIS-455: United States History Since 1945
L.HIS-456: The Civil Rights Movement

Course Descriptions

L.HIS-116: Ancient Greek Civilization

A survey of ancient Greek history and culture from the Bronze Age of heroes of the Trojan War through the Hellenistic period ushered in by Alexander the Great. The course will try to answer the questions “who were the ancient Greeks and why are they worth studying today?” by examining the history, art, and literature they produced. 3 credits.

L.HIS-117: Roman Civilization

A survey of Roman history and culture from the mysterious Etruscan period and the legendary founding of Rome through the fall of the western half of the Empire. The course will try to answer the questions “who were the Romans and why are they worth studying today?” by examining the history, art, and literature they produced. 3 credits.

L.HIS-121: United States To 1877

The founding, expansion, and development of the United States from discovery and colonization to the Reconstruction era. 3 credits. Fall semester.

L.HIS-122: United States Since 1865

United States history from the end of the Civil War to the present. 3 credits. Spring semester.

L.HIS-125: The Forgotten Burial Ground: Understanding Dubuque through the Third Street Cemetery

This in-depth January term study course focuses on the Third Street Cemetery, a lost burial ground in Dubuque. Located directly west of St. Raphael’s Cathedral on top of the bluff, a human bone discovered in 2007 led to a five-year salvage excavation by the Office of State Archeologist Burials Program.  When the team began the project they believed that they would remove a few burials missed during the disinterment following the closure of the graveyard.  Because they found 939 graves, the developer, hoping to build a condominium complex, called off the project. Through an exploration of American ideas of death and burial practices as well as contemporary conversations about balancing development with the preservation of sacred spaces, HIS 125 introduces students to the history of Dubuque and to vocations in the field of public history. First year students only. 3 credits. January Term.

L.HIS-140: Europe To 1750

A study of the political, cultural and intellectual developments of Europe to 1750. 3 credits.

L.HIS-141: Modern Europe Since 1750

A study of the political, cultural, and intellectual development of Europe. 3 credits.

L.HIS-155: Introduction to Latin American History

A one-semester introductory survey of Latin American history from pre-Columbian civilizations to the present. 3 credits.

L.HIS-161: Modern Africa since 1800

A survey of sub-Saharan Africa during the age of European exploration, conquest, and colonization. Topics include the revolutions in West and Southern Africa; abolition of the slave trade; European exploration and trade; military conquest and African resistance; white settlers in Africa; British, French, and German colonial rule; the economics of western colonialism; the emergence of African elites and the growth of African nationalism. 3 credits.

L.HIS-162: The Scramble for Africa

This course will offer an in-depth investigation into the “Scramble for Africa” which took place during the late 19th and early 20th centuries as European powers arbitrarily carved up the continent and created approximately 40 colonies and protectorates. The material will critically engage with the proliferation of European geographic societies, the culture of maps and cartography, and how the cultural, social, economic, and geopolitical consequences behind the creation of these former colonial borders continue to significantly influence and impact many present-day issues throughout the continent. Students will use resources in the campus library and other online map collections to conduct research and produce a work of digital history as well as participate in a role-playing simulation of the Berlin Conference of 1884-85 which set up the parameters for the partition of the African continent. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-175: Themes in World History

Instead of striving for a comprehensive coverage of world history, this course focuses on a few selected themes, such as migration, gender, warfare, and revolutions. Each theme will be examined in global and comparative perspectives. The emphasis of the course is placed on the modern world, but pre-modern influences and patterns will also be explored in some of the themes. 3 credits.

L.HIS-182: Islamic Civilizations

This course introduces students to important cultural, social, and religious trends in the history of this fascinating religion and relates them to key events. In addition to major themes such as Muhammad and the early history of Islam, the Sunni-Shi’ite divide, European colonialism, an introduction to the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the rise of Fundamentalism, the course may address other important topics such as women in Islam, examples of religious cooperation in Islamic Spain and Mughal India, pan-Arabism and nationalism, and heresy and dissent. 3 credits.

L.HIS-229: African American History-AI

This course studies the African American experience from slavery to the present, focusing on the formation of both personal and community identities in light of the experience of slavery and racism. Key to our exploration of African American identity will be resistance and reform. The course will also place a heavy emphasis on African American musical traditions. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB­220, L.LIB-130, or L.LIB-135. 3 credits.

L.HIS-230: Community & Identity in the American West-AI

This course focuses primarily on the interaction of Native Americans, Hispanics and the diverse population of immigrants (Euro-American, African-American, Chinese and European) who settled in United States territories west of the Mississippi River during the nineteenth century. Through primary source texts, objects, artwork and music, students will explore individual identity and how a group of individuals uses culture to build community. We will study how the interactions within a shared culture transform personal identities as well as how interactions across cultures shape each community. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB­220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-231: History of U.S. Sexuality-AV

The contemporary dialogue over sexual values and conflicts regarding sexual-decision making are not new to the American experience. In fact, scholars organize the history of American sexuality around “contested moments” in the debate over sexual ethics and behaviors. From the initial settlement of Europeans in the New World and their contact with the worldview of Native Americans to the more recent “sexual revolutions” of the modern era, Americans debated sex. The predominant ethical framework governing that conversation reflects the dominance of Protestant Christianity in American culture. Other ideological frameworks deriving from science, gender construction, economic patterns, racism and generational conflict also drive the evolution of sexual value sets. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-220, L.LIB-130, or L.LIB­135. 3 credits.

L.HIS-232: Herbert Hoover & the Great Depression

When elected in 1928, people perceived Herbert Hoover as a caring, compassionate, humanitarian. By 1932, American citizens believed he did not care about the people some blamed him for the depression and to others his name became synonymous with Satan. Why did this transformation in public opinion happen? This J-term course will explore this question by studying the effects of the Great Depression on the American populace and their response. It also examines the character and actions of Herbert Hoover both before and during his presidency. Key to our study will be the archival collections of the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library & Museum in West Branch, Iowa. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-235: Race & Gender Reform in the United States-AC

The course focuses on the struggles for racial and gender equality that took place during slavery–the abolition movement–contributed to the evolution of a women’s rights movement; more recently, the civil rights movement helped stimulate the women’s liberation movement. This course compares and contrasts these movements for racial and gender justice. We will study the past, but also bring our historical query to the present with a study of contemporary social movements. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB­110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-239: United States Women’s History-AC

This course focuses on the evolving concept of gender identity in American society. We will compare and contrast the experiences of women of varying ethnic, class, racial, and regional identities. Women labored at home and for wages. They built and influenced families, communities and organizations. They worked to reform society, shaping the social, political and economic world through their efforts. We will trace the evolution of women’s rights and gender equity from the early 1600s to the present. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB­220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-245: The Celts-AC

The Celts- Hags, Druids, and Saints pace the pages of Celtic myth and folklore, entrancing audiences and readers with stories of personal dilemmas, heroism, and magic. This course will analyze comparatively some Irish and Welsh myths, study the evolution of the legend of St. Patrick, and read fairy tales in an effort to understand important cultural realities and the social changes they reflect. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-248: The Cold War-AI

This course examines the history of the Cold War with special emphasis placed on the American and Soviet visions of the world community and Soviet and American identities underlying the conflict between these two superpowers. The course will also briefly look at the relations between the U. S. and post-Soviet Russia and the new Russian national identity developed after the Cold War. 3 credits.

L.HIS-249: Russian Civilization-AC

A study of Russian history with a special emphasis on the cultural context. The course starts with a brief overview of pre-Petrine Russia, but places the emphasis on imperial Russia (from Peter the Great to 1917) and Soviet and post-Soviet Russia. Students are expected to develop an in-depth understanding of continuity and change in Russian civilization and of the differences and similarities between Russian civilization and Western civilization. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-255: United States/Latin American Relations

A survey of Interamerican relations with emphasis on the period from the Spanish-American War (1898) to the present and on U.S. relations with Latin America. 3 credits.

L.HIS-257: Modern Brazilian History & Culture-AC

This course examines the history of Latin America’s largest geographic and most populous 7 nation from the arrival of the Portuguese Court in 1808 to present. Focus will be on issues such as the dynamics and legacies of the world’s largest slave society, economic growth

and industrialization, political organization and participation, liberalism, populism, authoritarianism and democracy, urbanization, race relations, European and Asian immigration to Brazil, ethnic and gender identities, regionalism, and elements of popular culture such as music, the arts, and sports. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-272: Japan in the Modern World–AI

This course is a study of modern Japanese history since the Meiji Restoration (1868), emphasizing: (1) Japan’s Westernization and contesting views of the national identity after the Meiji Restoration; (2) the Japanese view of themselves and other nations during World War II and the contesting national identities of the Japanese as victims or victimizers in the postwar discourse on war experience and responsibility; (3) the transformation of group identities brought about by economic development and social changes in Japan since 1945. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB­135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-275: History As Film: East Asia

This course examines themes in East Asian history dramatized in select feature films. Films to be viewed and critiqued in class include Genghis Khan: To the Ends of the Earth and Sea and The Last Samurai. A feature film on a historical theme is a piece of art, but it interprets history. While it is not a source of historical knowledge, its interpretation of history can and should be evaluated or critiqued; such evaluations or critiques would help us develop a more sophisticated understanding of the past. Prerequisite: L.LIB-100. 3 credits.

L.HIS-277: Modern Chinese History & Culture-AC

A study of China from the Opium War (1839-1842) to the present, with an emphasis on cultural history. This course examines how political, economic, and cultural changes during the last one and a half centuries have altered the sense the Chinese have of themselves and of China’s place in the world. It also examines how cultural tradition persists in China through changes. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100; L.LIB-105; L.LIB-110; and one from L.LIB­130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-279: Gandhi the Interfaith Peace-Builder-AV

This is a January term study travel course links Gandhi’s teachings on non-violence and interfaith peace-building to site visits in India related to his personal history, his historical environment, and the context of religious pluralism in India. The course will involve community-based learning as students hear lectures from peace-building experts in India, conduct interviews related to understanding the social ecologies of the subcontinent’s diverse cultural landscape, and visit organizations whose mission is to address injustice and religious discord. Approximately three days of the course will be spent on campus and 18 days spent in India or in travel to India. Sophomore standing or above. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-282: History as Film: Africa-AC

This course explores three cultural traditions–American, European, African–as represented in their dramatic/action films on African history, and helps develop an awareness of fundamental differences between western (American/European) and African perceptions of Africa, as long-standing western/African cultural traditions. The course will address issues of change and continuity in American and European cultural imaging of Africa; African critiques of American and European historical films; African stereotypes as reflections of evolving American and European race consciousness. Prerequisites: L.LIB­100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-285: The Arab-Israeli Conflict

The Arab-Israeli Conflict is an interactive course that will educate students about the complexities of the relationship between Israel, Palestinians, and their Middle Eastern neighbors and will engage students interactively with sources and people through reading, role play, and personal contact with people who are impacted by the situation, institutional peace efforts, grass-roots action toward reconciliation, and voices of dissent in both Palestinian and Jewish communities. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-288: The Historian as Investigator

This course surveys the vocations available through the discipline of history and overviews a range of methodological approaches. It also provides form skills training in research and writing. 3 credits. Spring semester.

L.HIS-320: Native American Archeology

Native Americans settled in North America at least 15,000 years ago. This course explores the ancient history of what became the continental United States, focusing on the Native American occupants of the Upper Mississippi River Valley. The course utilizes the discipline of archeology to explore the many different peoples who inhabited the United States prior to European colonization. We end our study with the peoples encountered by Europeans at contact in the 1600s. 3 credits.

L.HIS-329: The Enlightenment

An examination of the major institutions of eighteenth-century European society and the social history of ideas, particularly the contrast between elite and popular culture, and the primary social criticisms and reforms proposed by Enlightenment writers such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau, and the Encyclopedists. 3 credits.

L.HIS-330: The French Revolution                                        

The causes and course of the revolution including the origins of modern political culture in the Enlightenment and the revolution, international repercussions, terror, social consequences, and the Napoleonic period. 3 credits.

L.HIS-333: Imperial Geographies-AA

This course will study how the aesthetics of urban design and architecture from the late 19th century to present are symbolic of key questions that speak to imperialism, colonialism, nationalism, and the postcolonial condition. The course material will consider how architects, geographers, urban planners, and certain political and social classes engaged the legacy of colonialism and the politics of nationalism in their work and practices. Attention will be paid to the spatial organization of colonial and postcolonial cities, the politics of architectural and urban design, and the aesthetic nature of urban iconography. Case studies will be drawn from various cities throughout Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Caribbean. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-340: The Age of Kings & Conversions: Medieval Europe, 476-1075

An exploration of the vivacious and complex world of barbarians and monks, pagans and Christians, queens and bishops. Questions about historical interpretation and analysis of evidence are important to the study and understanding of this period. 3 credits.

L.HIS-341: The Age of Love & Reason: Medieval Europe, 1075-1530

A thematic study of the late medieval period that addresses issues of importance for that age and of interest for the modern world. Important themes will include love and marriage, chivalry, heresy, architecture and representation, individual and communal identity, the formation of nation-states, the Crusades, popular culture, intellectual developments, and the Italian Renaissance. 3 credits.

L.HIS-342: The Reformation-AI

The Reformation was by all accounts a spectacular event. Framed by the bitter denunciations of Martin Luther and the rigid restrictions of the Index of Forbidden books, enlivened by theological debate and mortified by extreme violence, the Reformation was to the people of the sixteenth century inspiring yet harsh and provided absolute certainty while at the same time provoking unimaginable confusion and complexity. How did it respond to the question, ‘What does it mean to be a Christian’? Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220.3 credits.

L.HIS-343: Medieval Christianity

A study of the development of western Christianity in the Middle Ages, with particular attention to formative influences, definitive tensions, diverse perceptions and popular appeal. The most important themes are monasticism, sanctity, heresy, and the spiritual expressions of women and men. Less emphasis upon institutional history. 3 credits.

L.HIS-344: Celtic Christianity & Roman Catholicism

This is a study travel course to England, Ireland, and Scotland, exploring historical places associated with the earliest Christians in those areas. Focusing especially on the collaboration and conflict between the Celtic Christianity of Ireland, Wales, and Scotland and the Roman Christianity spreading from the south of England, the course will examine the transition from paganism to Christianity and the conceptual realities that made that both possible and challenging. Destinations may vary each time the course is taught. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-346: Isle of the Saints: A Study Tour-AI

Through travel and study in Ireland, this course examines medieval Irish society, including law, genealogy and tribal affiliation, from the beginnings of Irish “history” in the fourth century A.D. to the religious and political turmoil of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, when Continental calls for Reformation, joined with Tudor and Cromwellian assertions of power to force Irish people to reorganize their communities and their sense of identity. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100; L.LIB-105; L.LIB-110; and one from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS 348: Paris in the 1920s & 1930s

Paris in the 20s was the place to be. There you could find a fusion of the latest, most daring trends in art, music and literature and a haven for those who had no “home” to speak of— displaced Russian nobility who had fled their homeland after the Revolution; Africans from various French colonies who had come to Paris to study; American blacks who had come to escape repressive Jim Crow laws. We will examine this period through art, music, literature and journalism. 3 credits.

L.HIS-349: The Second World War

The causes of the war, the European and Pacific campaigns, the civilian reaction, the Holocaust, resistance movements and the origins of the Cold War. 3 credits.

L.HIS-360: Southern Africa Since 1800

An examination of the impact of white settler rule in the region of Southern Africa, which includes countries of Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Topics include settler colonialism; the imperial scramble for colonies; British and Portuguese colonial rule; the regional mine labor system; Apartheid, and African struggles for independence. 3 credits.

L.HIS-365: Contemporary Urban Portugal

The main content of the course will investigate the various historical and geographical issues surrounding the fall and legacies of the Portuguese empire in Africa, such as national identity and geopolitics, migration, and subsequent changes to the cultural landscape and human geography of the metropolitan Lisbon area. Students will have the opportunity to study these themes firsthand by visiting many of Lisbon’s historic and newly constructed neighborhoods, museums, monuments, and community centers that speak to these dynamic issues. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-380: The Cold War

A study of the Cold War as a global confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union and as a global conflict between Communism and capitalism. Topics include the origins of the Cold War, nuclear weapons and the Cold War, ideologies of the Cold War and propaganda, the Third World and the Cold War, and the end of the Cold War. 3 credits.

L.HIS-386: United States Survey for Teachers

Designed to prepare K-12 teachers of social studies and United States history, this course develops the ability to conceptualize and define the American past in order to teach United States history. This course provides models and tools for determining the overarching themes that help explain and explore the American past using a wide variety of methods. Students will identify resources that help teachers make decisions on what to teach, define historical trends, and analyze reading strategies in the field of history, including reading comprehension and critical reading. Required for the endorsement in American History and the All Social Sciences Teaching endorsement. Restricted to Teacher Education students only. 3 credits.

L.HIS-392: History as Film

This course examines the uses of film as sources of historical knowledge, principally through documentaries but also through semi-documentaries and fictional films. Non­traditional materials of historians (motion-picture films) as well as traditional materials (written sources) will enhance significantly the student’s interest in and understanding of modern history. Topics vary and will be determined by the availability of films and students’ interest. 3 credits.

L.HIS-395: Topics

History topics course. Used to develop courses which have not been approved under another catalog number. See Division Chair for more information.

L.HIS-404: Historical Geography

An historical overview of the major developments in formal, practical, and popular global geopolitics from the late 19th century to present. The material will examine the origins, application, and outcomes of geopolitical theories related to cartography; empire and imperialism; nation building and nationalism; decolonization and independence; the Cold War; and the multi-faceted dimensions of globalization. This course will partially satisfy the geography requirement for the All-Social Science teaching endorsement. 3 credits.

L.HIS-427: United States Catholicism

The history of Roman Catholics and Roman Catholicism in the U.S. from colonial beginnings to the present, with special emphasis on the changes in and anomalies of Catholic identity. 3 credits.

L.HIS-431: Revolutionary Era in the United States

The U.S. in the 18th century, development of British imperial policy and reactions to it, the break from the British empire, experiments in new forms of self-government and the framing, ratification and implementation of the U.S. Constitution in the 1790s. 3 credits.

L.HIS-439: The Creation of Modern America, 1877-1924

This course concentrates on the incredible transformation of society that took place in the United States between 1877 and 1924. The changes of this period resulted in the creation of modern American society. To understand the 20th century we must understand the changes begun during the Gilded Age and completed by the 1920s. Because these changes took place in almost every area of society, this course will draw upon social, cultural, economic, diplomatic, and political history. 3 credits.

L.HIS-443: Civil War & Reconstruction

The U.S. from the 1840s through the 1870s with emphasis on the causes of the war, consequences of the military conflict and the difficulties of reconciling the former enemies. 3 credits.

L.HIS-453: The Great Depression & the New Deal

A study of the Great Depression in the United States, including its origins, the consequences of depression on U.S. society and the New Deal as a response to the crisis. Different perspectives based on race, gender, age and region will be discussed. This course will also examine the legacy of the New Deal, including the evolution of the social welfare state, the transformation of the role of government in society and the expansion of the power of the president. 3 credits.

L.HIS-455: United States History Since 1945

The political, social, and economic history of the U.S. from the end of World War II to the present, including the evolution of Cold War politics and major changes in U.S. society. 3 credits.

L.HIS-456: The Civil Rights Movement                           

A focus on the post-World War II struggle for racial equality in southern and northern states. Organizations studied include the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, Congress of Racial Equality, the Black Panthers, the Nation of Islam, and a sample of local action groups. 3 credits.

L.HIS-489: The Historical Thinker

Historians interpret the past and often employ theoretical concepts to convey meaning. Students enrolled in this course will not only study theory, but see its application in a variety of modes of discourse and in settings outside of academia. Open only to junior and senior history majors, normally in their second semester junior year. 3 credits. Spring semester.

L.HIS-490: The Professional Historian

This research seminar guides students through the creation of a project, linked to a career pathway, based on original research. For history majors only, normally in their senior year. Cannot be repeated more than once. 3 credits. Fall semester.

L.HIS-494: Internship in History

This internship will provide students with a learning experience while working several hours a week for a semester or during the summer for a historical society, history firm, museum, archive, research library, or some equivalent institution. Prerequisites: completion of 12 credits in history prior to the beginning of the internship, and permission of the division chair and the work supervisor of the internship at the institution where the internship will be performed. 2-3 credits (a minimum of 50 hours of work required per credit).

RELATED COURSES: Economics, International Studies, Politics, Sociology

Career Opportunities

After receiving your degree from Loras, your career could take off into one of these fields:

• High School Teacher
• Business Management
• Public Relations Specialist
• Librarian
• Police Officer
• Ministry/Priesthood
• Accountant
• Museum and archives

Loras College Department Staff

Kristin Anderson-Bricker, Ph.D.
Professor of History
563.588.7403 | Kristin.Anderson-Bricker@loras.edu

Curriculum Vitae

Kristin Anderson-Bricker completed a doctorate at Syracuse University in United States social and cultural history with specialties in race, gender and social movements. Upon graduation in 1997, she accepted a position at Loras College in Dubuque, Iowa. Anderson-Bricker teaches topical courses covering American history from the late nineteenth century through to the present. She also teaches on the American West, Native Americans in the Upper Mississippi River Valley, Women’s History, sexuality, African Americans and historical methods (research and teaching).

She is currently at work on a book manuscript, Going Beyond the Rules: Catholic Young Adults Making Sexual Decisions, designed to initiate between students a conversation about sex to assist them in determining the values they want to apply to their choices about sex.

Her service work has focused on diversity initiatives including committee chair responsibilities, gender equity and a civil discourse initiative (DuTalk). Anderson-Bricker has directed the Honors Program and served on many committees including Rank and Tenure, Faculty Senate and First Year Experience. In addition to serving on the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library Association’s travel grant committee and assessing manuscripts for the State Historical Society of Iowa, she has served the profession as a program reviewer for the National Endowment for the Humanities, Humanities Iowa, Dubuque County Historical Society and Effigy Mounds National Monument.

John Eby, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
Chairperson for Faculty Senate
563.588.4929 | John.Eby@loras.edu

Mark Kehren, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
563.588.7633 | Mark.Kehren@loras.edu

Mark E. Kehren, Ph.D. teaches interdisciplinary courses on transnational history, global migration, critical geography, and contemporary Africa. He currently is the Director of the International Studies Undergraduate Major at Loras and has conducted extensive ethnographic and archival research across the Luso-African World (Portugal, Cape Verde, Mozambique, and Brazil) and is currently working on a project related to cuisine, foodways, and cultural identity among the African and Afro-descendant communities in Lisbon. Most recently he was a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) visiting scholar at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) to participate in a seminar focusing on immigrants, emigrants, and their homelands.

Lee Zhu, Ph.D.
Professor of History
563.588.7199 | Lee.Zhu@loras.edu

Dr. Lee S. Zhu was born in China. He received his doctorate degree from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He teaches East Asian History, Russian history and the history of the Second World War and the Cold War. His research interests center on the history of the Soviet Union during the Stalin period and the history of the People’s Republic of China during the Mao years. Dr. Lee conducted research in archives in Moscow, Shanghai and Beijing, and he published several scholarly articles examining the impact of the Communist ideology on Soviet and Chinese education. He took students on summer research trips and January-term trips to China.

Amy Lorenz, Ph.D.
Professor of Modern Languages & Culture
563.588.7806 | Amy.Lorenz@loras.edu

For many years, Amy Lorenz was Loras’ French Professor. When that program ended, the History and Religious Studies programs kindly “adopted” her. She now teaches courses on French literature in translation, the Renaissance and Reformation in Europe, the Enlightenment, Paris in the 20s and 30s, Introduction to the Bible, and a seminar on the letters of Paul. She also enjoys teaching regularly in the general education program, especially in the clusters and the LIB 130 cohort.

Her current research stems from her more recent formal training in theology and focuses on Second Temple Judaism; Jesus, Paul and Judaism; the Roman Empire and early followers of Jesus; and scripture.

She has had the privilege of working with 2 January term groups of students in France and Italy and has enjoyed those travels immensely. She lived in France between her B.A. and M.A. degrees, working in the school system there, and returned there to spend several more months during her Ph.D. studies. She returns as often as she is able to stay with friends.